Childhood alopecia areata—Data from the National Alopecia Areata Registry

Iris Wohlmuth-Wieser, Joyce S. Osei, David Norris, Vera Price, Maria K Hordinsky, Angela Christiano, Madeleine Duvic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Objectives: Alopecia areata may occur at any age and is the third-most-common dermatosis in children. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical and epidemiologic features of children and adolescents with alopecia areata based on the data of the National Alopecia Areata registry on children and adolescents. Methods: Two thousand two hundred eighteen children and adolescents with alopecia areata self-enrolled in the National Alopecia Areata Registry and completed a web-based, self-administered, short-intake screening questionnaire (first tier). In the second tier, 643 patients participated in a clinical examination and completed a long-form questionnaire. Results: Mean age of onset was 5.9 ± 4.1 years. With a female to male ratio of 1.5:1, alopecia areata was more prevalent in girls, but boys were significantly more likely to have a severe type (P =.009). One-fourth of all children had a positive family history, with 8% having more than three affected relatives. The disease most commonly associated with alopecia areata was atopic dermatitis (32.7%). Conclusion: Childhood alopecia areata is more prevalent in girls than in boys, but boys have more extensive alopecia areata. Despite the low prevalence, congenital alopecia areata is an important differential diagnosis for neonatal hair loss. Alopecia areata runs in families, suggesting an underlying genetic background. One-quarter of the children reported at least one affected first-degree relative; 8% had more than three affected relatives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-169
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Dermatology
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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Alopecia Areata
Alopecia
Registries
Atopic Dermatitis
Age of Onset
Skin Diseases
Differential Diagnosis

Keywords

  • alopecia
  • hair disorders

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Wohlmuth-Wieser, I., Osei, J. S., Norris, D., Price, V., Hordinsky, M. K., Christiano, A., & Duvic, M. (2018). Childhood alopecia areata—Data from the National Alopecia Areata Registry. Pediatric Dermatology, 35(2), 164-169. https://doi.org/10.1111/pde.13387

Childhood alopecia areata—Data from the National Alopecia Areata Registry. / Wohlmuth-Wieser, Iris; Osei, Joyce S.; Norris, David; Price, Vera; Hordinsky, Maria K; Christiano, Angela; Duvic, Madeleine.

In: Pediatric Dermatology, Vol. 35, No. 2, 01.03.2018, p. 164-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wohlmuth-Wieser, I, Osei, JS, Norris, D, Price, V, Hordinsky, MK, Christiano, A & Duvic, M 2018, 'Childhood alopecia areata—Data from the National Alopecia Areata Registry', Pediatric Dermatology, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 164-169. https://doi.org/10.1111/pde.13387
Wohlmuth-Wieser I, Osei JS, Norris D, Price V, Hordinsky MK, Christiano A et al. Childhood alopecia areata—Data from the National Alopecia Areata Registry. Pediatric Dermatology. 2018 Mar 1;35(2):164-169. https://doi.org/10.1111/pde.13387
Wohlmuth-Wieser, Iris ; Osei, Joyce S. ; Norris, David ; Price, Vera ; Hordinsky, Maria K ; Christiano, Angela ; Duvic, Madeleine. / Childhood alopecia areata—Data from the National Alopecia Areata Registry. In: Pediatric Dermatology. 2018 ; Vol. 35, No. 2. pp. 164-169.
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abstract = "Background/Objectives: Alopecia areata may occur at any age and is the third-most-common dermatosis in children. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical and epidemiologic features of children and adolescents with alopecia areata based on the data of the National Alopecia Areata registry on children and adolescents. Methods: Two thousand two hundred eighteen children and adolescents with alopecia areata self-enrolled in the National Alopecia Areata Registry and completed a web-based, self-administered, short-intake screening questionnaire (first tier). In the second tier, 643 patients participated in a clinical examination and completed a long-form questionnaire. Results: Mean age of onset was 5.9 ± 4.1 years. With a female to male ratio of 1.5:1, alopecia areata was more prevalent in girls, but boys were significantly more likely to have a severe type (P =.009). One-fourth of all children had a positive family history, with 8{\%} having more than three affected relatives. The disease most commonly associated with alopecia areata was atopic dermatitis (32.7{\%}). Conclusion: Childhood alopecia areata is more prevalent in girls than in boys, but boys have more extensive alopecia areata. Despite the low prevalence, congenital alopecia areata is an important differential diagnosis for neonatal hair loss. Alopecia areata runs in families, suggesting an underlying genetic background. One-quarter of the children reported at least one affected first-degree relative; 8{\%} had more than three affected relatives.",
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