Characterizing the “sweet spot” for the preservation of a T-cell line using osmolytes

Chia Hsing Pi, Guanglin Yu, Ashley Petersen, Allison Hubel

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10 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the post-thaw recovery of Jurkat cells cryopreserved in single osmolyte solutions containing sucrose, glycerol or isoleucine, as well as in a combination of the three osmolytes. Cell response was determined using low temperature Raman Spectroscopy and variation in post-thaw recovery with composition was analyzed using statistical modeling. Post-thaw recovery of Jurkat cells in single osmolyte was low. A combination of the osmolytes displayed a non-linear relationship between composition and post-thaw recovery, suggesting that interactions exist between the different solutes. The post-thaw recovery for an optimized multicomponent solution was comparable to that observed using 10% dimethyl sulfoxide and a cooling rate of 1 °C/min. Statistical modeling was used to characterize the importance of each osmolyte in the combination and test for interactions between osmolytes. Higher concentrations of glycerol increase post-thaw recovery and interactions between sucrose and glycerol, as well as sucrose and isoleucine improve post-thaw recovery. Raman images clearly demonstrated that damaging intracellular ice formation was observed more often in the presence of single osmolytes as well as non-optimized multi-component solution compositions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number16223
JournalScientific reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors would like to thank Prof. Diana Negoescu for valuable comments and Elizabeth Moy for helping with experiments. This work was funded by the National Institutes of Health under R01EB023880. Parts of this work were carried out in the Characterization Facility, University of Minnesota, which received partial support from NSF through the MRSEC program. This research was also supported by the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, grant UL1TR002494. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

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