Characterizing Self-Monitoring Behavior and Its Association With Physical Activity and Weight Loss Maintenance

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Reviewing gaps in self-monitoring during weight loss interventions may help identify individuals demonstrating signs of disengagement in behaviors, including moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), associated with weight loss maintenance. This study examined the associations of different aspects of self-monitoring during a weight loss intervention with 24-month MVPA and weight. Methods: Secondary data analysis from the Tracking Study, a trial comparing weight-tracking frequency during a lifestyle weight loss program, was conducted. Self-monitoring logs from n =339 participants were used to define 4 characteristics and 4 specific gap lengths: short (1-4 weeks), medium (5-8 weeks), long (9-12 weeks), and extra long (>12 weeks). Self-reported MVPA and staff-measured weight were measured at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Generalized estimating equation modeling examined the association between self-monitoring characteristics and reported MVPA and weight. Results: Participants with gaps in self-monitoring as early as the second week of the intervention reported less MVPA and weighed more at 24 months. Furthermore, consistent tracking of MVPA was associated with higher reported MVPA and lower weight. Conclusions: Behavior tracking provides important information about behavioral disengagement early in the intervention process. Future work should test intervention augmentations to improve behavior change when disengagement is detected.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Lifestyle Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Weight Loss
Maintenance
Weights and Measures
Weight Reduction Programs
Life Style

Keywords

  • behavior maintenance
  • physical activity
  • self-monitoring
  • weight loss

Cite this

@article{b693090923474f75b41d4cde44a74d5b,
title = "Characterizing Self-Monitoring Behavior and Its Association With Physical Activity and Weight Loss Maintenance",
abstract = "Introduction: Reviewing gaps in self-monitoring during weight loss interventions may help identify individuals demonstrating signs of disengagement in behaviors, including moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), associated with weight loss maintenance. This study examined the associations of different aspects of self-monitoring during a weight loss intervention with 24-month MVPA and weight. Methods: Secondary data analysis from the Tracking Study, a trial comparing weight-tracking frequency during a lifestyle weight loss program, was conducted. Self-monitoring logs from n =339 participants were used to define 4 characteristics and 4 specific gap lengths: short (1-4 weeks), medium (5-8 weeks), long (9-12 weeks), and extra long (>12 weeks). Self-reported MVPA and staff-measured weight were measured at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Generalized estimating equation modeling examined the association between self-monitoring characteristics and reported MVPA and weight. Results: Participants with gaps in self-monitoring as early as the second week of the intervention reported less MVPA and weighed more at 24 months. Furthermore, consistent tracking of MVPA was associated with higher reported MVPA and lower weight. Conclusions: Behavior tracking provides important information about behavioral disengagement early in the intervention process. Future work should test intervention augmentations to improve behavior change when disengagement is detected.",
keywords = "behavior maintenance, physical activity, self-monitoring, weight loss",
author = "Gavin, {Kara L.} and Sherwood, {Nancy E} and Julian Wolfson and Pereira, {Mark A} and Linde, {Jennifer A}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1559827618790556",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine",
issn = "1559-8276",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characterizing Self-Monitoring Behavior and Its Association With Physical Activity and Weight Loss Maintenance

AU - Gavin, Kara L.

AU - Sherwood, Nancy E

AU - Wolfson, Julian

AU - Pereira, Mark A

AU - Linde, Jennifer A

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Introduction: Reviewing gaps in self-monitoring during weight loss interventions may help identify individuals demonstrating signs of disengagement in behaviors, including moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), associated with weight loss maintenance. This study examined the associations of different aspects of self-monitoring during a weight loss intervention with 24-month MVPA and weight. Methods: Secondary data analysis from the Tracking Study, a trial comparing weight-tracking frequency during a lifestyle weight loss program, was conducted. Self-monitoring logs from n =339 participants were used to define 4 characteristics and 4 specific gap lengths: short (1-4 weeks), medium (5-8 weeks), long (9-12 weeks), and extra long (>12 weeks). Self-reported MVPA and staff-measured weight were measured at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Generalized estimating equation modeling examined the association between self-monitoring characteristics and reported MVPA and weight. Results: Participants with gaps in self-monitoring as early as the second week of the intervention reported less MVPA and weighed more at 24 months. Furthermore, consistent tracking of MVPA was associated with higher reported MVPA and lower weight. Conclusions: Behavior tracking provides important information about behavioral disengagement early in the intervention process. Future work should test intervention augmentations to improve behavior change when disengagement is detected.

AB - Introduction: Reviewing gaps in self-monitoring during weight loss interventions may help identify individuals demonstrating signs of disengagement in behaviors, including moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), associated with weight loss maintenance. This study examined the associations of different aspects of self-monitoring during a weight loss intervention with 24-month MVPA and weight. Methods: Secondary data analysis from the Tracking Study, a trial comparing weight-tracking frequency during a lifestyle weight loss program, was conducted. Self-monitoring logs from n =339 participants were used to define 4 characteristics and 4 specific gap lengths: short (1-4 weeks), medium (5-8 weeks), long (9-12 weeks), and extra long (>12 weeks). Self-reported MVPA and staff-measured weight were measured at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Generalized estimating equation modeling examined the association between self-monitoring characteristics and reported MVPA and weight. Results: Participants with gaps in self-monitoring as early as the second week of the intervention reported less MVPA and weighed more at 24 months. Furthermore, consistent tracking of MVPA was associated with higher reported MVPA and lower weight. Conclusions: Behavior tracking provides important information about behavioral disengagement early in the intervention process. Future work should test intervention augmentations to improve behavior change when disengagement is detected.

KW - behavior maintenance

KW - physical activity

KW - self-monitoring

KW - weight loss

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85052292729&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85052292729&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1559827618790556

DO - 10.1177/1559827618790556

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85052292729

JO - American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine

JF - American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine

SN - 1559-8276

ER -