Characterization of the urogenital microbiome in Miniature Schnauzers with and without calcium oxalate urolithiasis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Calcium oxalate (CaOx) uroliths are common in dogs. Humans with CaOx urolithiasis exhibit alterations of the urinary and urogenital microbiomes that might mediate urolith formation. Detection of urogenital microbes associated with CaOx in dogs could inform disease pathophysiology. Objective: To identify compositional differences in the urogenital microbiome of Miniature Schnauzers with and without CaOx uroliths. Animals: Nineteen midstream, voided urine samples from Miniature Schnauzers with (n = 9) and without (n = 10) a history of CaOx urolithiasis. Methods: Analytical cross-sectional study. Microbial DNA was extracted from previously frozen urine samples and sequenced for the bacterial 16S rRNA V3-V4 hypervariable regions. Diversity and composition of microbial populations were compared between urolith formers and controls. Results: Alpha and beta diversity measures were similar between groups. Five individual bacterial taxa differed in abundance (indicator values >0.5 and P <.05): Acinetobacter, 2 Geobacillus variants, and Hydrogenophaga were overrepresented in the urine of urolith formers, and Sphingopyxis was overrepresented in controls. Two distinct subtypes of urine microbial composition were observed based on beta diversity measures, independent of urolith status, and other clinical variables. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Although we did not detect a difference in the overall urogenital microbial composition between groups, observed differences in individual bacterial taxa might be clinically relevant. For example, Acinetobacter was overrepresented in urolith formers and is associated with CaOx urolithiasis in humans. Two unique clusters of the microbiome were identified, independent of urolith status, which may represent distinct urotypes present in Miniature Schnauzers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1341-1352
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of veterinary internal medicine
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The work in this study was funded by the University of Minnesota's College of Veterinary Medicine Resident and Graduate Student Research Grant. Dr Coffey was supported by an institutional NIH T32 Comparative Medicine and Pathology Training Grant (University of Minnesota, T32 OD010993‐15). Partial support for Dr. Furrow was provided by an NIH ORIP K01 Mentored Research Scientist Development Award (K01‐OD019912).

Funding Information:
NIH ORIP K01 Mentored Research Scientist Development Award, Grant/Award Number: K01‐OD019912; NIH T32 Comparative Medicine and Pathology Training Grant, Grant/Award Number: T32 OD010993‐15; University of Minnesota's College of Veterinary Medicine Resident and Graduate Student Research Grant Funding information

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

Keywords

  • canine
  • stones
  • urinary tract infection
  • urobiome

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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