Characterization of antimicrobial-resistant phenotypes and genotypes among Salmonella enterica recovered from pigs on farms, from transport trucks, and from pigs after slaughter

Wondwossen A. Gebreyes, Peter R. Davies, Paa Kobina Turkson, W. E.Morgan Morrow, Julie A. Funk, Craig Altier, Siddhartha Thakur

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39 Scopus citations

Abstract

The main objectives of this study were to determine antimicrobial resistance patterns among Salmonella serotypes and to evaluate the role of transport trucks in dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant strains of Salmonella. Salmonella from groups of nursery and finishing pigs on farms, from trucks, and from pigs after slaughter were compared using serotyping, patterns of antimicrobial resistance, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. The five farms included in the study yielded 858 isolates representing 27 Salmonella serovars. The most common resistance observed (80% of all isolates) was to tetracycline; resistance to ampicillin (42%), chloramphenicol (31%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (30%), and piperacillin (31%) also were common. We found a correlation between serovar and antimicrobial resistance. High correlation was found between Salmonella Typhimurium var. Copenhagen and chloramphenicol resistance (Spearman rank correlation, p = 0.7). Multidrug resistance was observed primarily in Salmonella Typhimurium var. Copenhagen (94%) and Salmonella Typhimurium (93%) and was much less common in the other common serovars, including Salmonella Derby (7%) and Salmonella Heidelberg (8%). Of the 225 isolates exhibiting the most common pentaresistance pattern in this study, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-ampicillin-chloramphenicol-piperacillin- tetracycline, 220 (98%) were Salmonella Typhimurium var. Copenhagen, and 86% of the isolates of this serovar had this pattern. Isolates from the trucks were similar, based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, to those from the cecum and mesenteric lymph nodes of pigs on two of the farms, suggesting the probable infection of pigs during transport. Class I integrons were also common among various serovars.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)698-705
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of food protection
Volume67
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2004

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