Characterization and Valuation of the Uncertainty of Calibrated Parameters in Microsimulation Decision Models

Fernando Alarid-Escudero, Amy B. Knudsen, Jonathan Ozik, Nicholson Collier, Karen M. Kuntz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: We evaluated the implications of different approaches to characterize the uncertainty of calibrated parameters of microsimulation decision models (DMs) and quantified the value of such uncertainty in decision making. Methods: We calibrated the natural history model of CRC to simulated epidemiological data with different degrees of uncertainty and obtained the joint posterior distribution of the parameters using a Bayesian approach. We conducted a probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) on all the model parameters with different characterizations of the uncertainty of the calibrated parameters. We estimated the value of uncertainty of the various characterizations with a value of information analysis. We conducted all analyses using high-performance computing resources running the Extreme-scale Model Exploration with Swift (EMEWS) framework. Results: The posterior distribution had a high correlation among some parameters. The parameters of the Weibull hazard function for the age of onset of adenomas had the highest posterior correlation of −0.958. When comparing full posterior distributions and the maximum-a-posteriori estimate of the calibrated parameters, there is little difference in the spread of the distribution of the CEA outcomes with a similar expected value of perfect information (EVPI) of $653 and $685, respectively, at a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $66,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Ignoring correlation on the calibrated parameters’ posterior distribution produced the broadest distribution of CEA outcomes and the highest EVPI of $809 at the same WTP threshold. Conclusion: Different characterizations of the uncertainty of calibrated parameters affect the expected value of eliminating parametric uncertainty on the CEA. Ignoring inherent correlation among calibrated parameters on a PSA overestimates the value of uncertainty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number780917
JournalFrontiers in Physiology
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - May 9 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Financial support for this study was provided in part by a grant from the National Council of Science and Technology of Mexico (CONACYT) and a Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship from the Graduate School of the University of Minnesota as part of Dr. Alarid-Escudero’s doctoral program. All authors were supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute (U01- CA-199335 and U01-CA-253913) as part of the Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET). The work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, under contract (No. DE- AC0206CH11357). The funding agencies had no role in the study’s design, interpretation of results, or writing of the manuscript. The content is solely the authors’ responsibility and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The funding agreement ensured the authors’ independence in designing the study, interpreting the data, writing, and publishing the report. This research was completed with resources provided by the Research Computing Center at the University of Chicago (Midway2 cluster).

Funding Information:
Financial support for this study was provided in part by a grant from the National Council of Science and Technology of Mexico (CONACYT) and a Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship from the Graduate School of the University of Minnesota as part of Dr. Alarid-Escudero’s doctoral program. All authors were supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute (U01- CA-199335 and U01-CA-253913) as part of the Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET). The work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, under contract (No. DE- AC0206CH11357). The funding agencies had no role in the study’s design, interpretation of results, or writing of the manuscript. The content is solely the authors’ responsibility and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The funding agreement ensured the authors’ independence in designing the study, interpreting the data, writing, and publishing the report. This research was completed with resources provided by the Research Computing Center at the University of Chicago (Midway2 cluster).

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2022 Alarid-Escudero, Knudsen, Ozik, Collier and Kuntz.

Keywords

  • Bayesian
  • EMEWS
  • calibration
  • decision-analytic models
  • high-performance computing
  • microsimulation models
  • uncertainty quantification
  • value of information analysis

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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