Characteristics of pica behavior among mothers around lake victoria, Kenya: A cross-sectional study

Esther O. Chung, Brian Mattah, Matthew D. Hickey, Charles R. Salmen, Erin M. Milner, Elizabeth A. Bukusi, Justin S. Brashares, Sera L. Young, Lia C.H. Fernald, Kathryn J. Fiorella

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Pica, the craving and purposeful consumption of nonfoods, is poorly understood. We described the prevalence of pica among women on Mfangano Island, Kenya, and examined sociodemographic and health correlates. Methods: Our cross-sectional study included 299 pregnant or postpartum women in 2012. We used a 24-h recall to assess pica, defined as consumption of earth (geophagy), charcoal/ash, or raw starches (amylophagy) and built multivariable logistic regression models to examine sociodemographic and health correlates of pica. Results: Eighty-one women (27.1%) engaged in pica in the previous 24 h, with 59.3% reporting amylophagy and 56.8% reporting geophagy, charcoal, and/or ash consumption. The most common substances consumed were raw cassava (n = 30, 36.6%), odowa, a chalky, soft rock-like earth (n = 21, 25.6%), and soil (n = 17, 20.7%). Geophagy, charcoal, and/or ash consumption was negatively associated with breastfeeding (OR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.18–0.81), and amylophagy was associated with pregnancy (OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 1.24–14.96). Pica was more common within one of six study regions (OR = 3.64, 95% CI: 1.39–9.51). We found no evidence of an association between food insecurity and pica. Conclusion: Pica was a common behavior among women, and the prevalence underscores the need to uncover its dietary, environmental, and cultural etiologies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2510
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume16
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2 2019

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Pica
Kenya
Lakes
Cross-Sectional Studies
Mothers
Charcoal
Logistic Models
Manihot
Food Supply
Health
Breast Feeding
Islands
Starch
Postpartum Period
Pregnant Women
Soil
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • Amylophagy
  • Breastfeeding
  • Geophagy
  • Kenya
  • Pica
  • Pregnancy

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Cite this

Characteristics of pica behavior among mothers around lake victoria, Kenya : A cross-sectional study. / Chung, Esther O.; Mattah, Brian; Hickey, Matthew D.; Salmen, Charles R.; Milner, Erin M.; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Brashares, Justin S.; Young, Sera L.; Fernald, Lia C.H.; Fiorella, Kathryn J.

In: International journal of environmental research and public health, Vol. 16, No. 14, 2510, 02.07.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chung, EO, Mattah, B, Hickey, MD, Salmen, CR, Milner, EM, Bukusi, EA, Brashares, JS, Young, SL, Fernald, LCH & Fiorella, KJ 2019, 'Characteristics of pica behavior among mothers around lake victoria, Kenya: A cross-sectional study', International journal of environmental research and public health, vol. 16, no. 14, 2510. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16142510
Chung, Esther O. ; Mattah, Brian ; Hickey, Matthew D. ; Salmen, Charles R. ; Milner, Erin M. ; Bukusi, Elizabeth A. ; Brashares, Justin S. ; Young, Sera L. ; Fernald, Lia C.H. ; Fiorella, Kathryn J. / Characteristics of pica behavior among mothers around lake victoria, Kenya : A cross-sectional study. In: International journal of environmental research and public health. 2019 ; Vol. 16, No. 14.
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abstract = "Background: Pica, the craving and purposeful consumption of nonfoods, is poorly understood. We described the prevalence of pica among women on Mfangano Island, Kenya, and examined sociodemographic and health correlates. Methods: Our cross-sectional study included 299 pregnant or postpartum women in 2012. We used a 24-h recall to assess pica, defined as consumption of earth (geophagy), charcoal/ash, or raw starches (amylophagy) and built multivariable logistic regression models to examine sociodemographic and health correlates of pica. Results: Eighty-one women (27.1{\%}) engaged in pica in the previous 24 h, with 59.3{\%} reporting amylophagy and 56.8{\%} reporting geophagy, charcoal, and/or ash consumption. The most common substances consumed were raw cassava (n = 30, 36.6{\%}), odowa, a chalky, soft rock-like earth (n = 21, 25.6{\%}), and soil (n = 17, 20.7{\%}). Geophagy, charcoal, and/or ash consumption was negatively associated with breastfeeding (OR = 0.38, 95{\%} CI: 0.18–0.81), and amylophagy was associated with pregnancy (OR = 4.31, 95{\%} CI: 1.24–14.96). Pica was more common within one of six study regions (OR = 3.64, 95{\%} CI: 1.39–9.51). We found no evidence of an association between food insecurity and pica. Conclusion: Pica was a common behavior among women, and the prevalence underscores the need to uncover its dietary, environmental, and cultural etiologies.",
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T2 - A cross-sectional study

AU - Chung, Esther O.

AU - Mattah, Brian

AU - Hickey, Matthew D.

AU - Salmen, Charles R.

AU - Milner, Erin M.

AU - Bukusi, Elizabeth A.

AU - Brashares, Justin S.

AU - Young, Sera L.

AU - Fernald, Lia C.H.

AU - Fiorella, Kathryn J.

PY - 2019/7/2

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N2 - Background: Pica, the craving and purposeful consumption of nonfoods, is poorly understood. We described the prevalence of pica among women on Mfangano Island, Kenya, and examined sociodemographic and health correlates. Methods: Our cross-sectional study included 299 pregnant or postpartum women in 2012. We used a 24-h recall to assess pica, defined as consumption of earth (geophagy), charcoal/ash, or raw starches (amylophagy) and built multivariable logistic regression models to examine sociodemographic and health correlates of pica. Results: Eighty-one women (27.1%) engaged in pica in the previous 24 h, with 59.3% reporting amylophagy and 56.8% reporting geophagy, charcoal, and/or ash consumption. The most common substances consumed were raw cassava (n = 30, 36.6%), odowa, a chalky, soft rock-like earth (n = 21, 25.6%), and soil (n = 17, 20.7%). Geophagy, charcoal, and/or ash consumption was negatively associated with breastfeeding (OR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.18–0.81), and amylophagy was associated with pregnancy (OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 1.24–14.96). Pica was more common within one of six study regions (OR = 3.64, 95% CI: 1.39–9.51). We found no evidence of an association between food insecurity and pica. Conclusion: Pica was a common behavior among women, and the prevalence underscores the need to uncover its dietary, environmental, and cultural etiologies.

AB - Background: Pica, the craving and purposeful consumption of nonfoods, is poorly understood. We described the prevalence of pica among women on Mfangano Island, Kenya, and examined sociodemographic and health correlates. Methods: Our cross-sectional study included 299 pregnant or postpartum women in 2012. We used a 24-h recall to assess pica, defined as consumption of earth (geophagy), charcoal/ash, or raw starches (amylophagy) and built multivariable logistic regression models to examine sociodemographic and health correlates of pica. Results: Eighty-one women (27.1%) engaged in pica in the previous 24 h, with 59.3% reporting amylophagy and 56.8% reporting geophagy, charcoal, and/or ash consumption. The most common substances consumed were raw cassava (n = 30, 36.6%), odowa, a chalky, soft rock-like earth (n = 21, 25.6%), and soil (n = 17, 20.7%). Geophagy, charcoal, and/or ash consumption was negatively associated with breastfeeding (OR = 0.38, 95% CI: 0.18–0.81), and amylophagy was associated with pregnancy (OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 1.24–14.96). Pica was more common within one of six study regions (OR = 3.64, 95% CI: 1.39–9.51). We found no evidence of an association between food insecurity and pica. Conclusion: Pica was a common behavior among women, and the prevalence underscores the need to uncover its dietary, environmental, and cultural etiologies.

KW - Amylophagy

KW - Breastfeeding

KW - Geophagy

KW - Kenya

KW - Pica

KW - Pregnancy

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