Characteristics and Dietary Patterns of Adolescents Who Value Eating Locally Grown, Organic, Nongenetically Engineered, and Nonprocessed Food

Ramona Robinson-O'Brien, Nicole Larson, Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, Peter Hannan, Mary Story

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine characteristics of adolescents who value eating locally grown, organic, nongenetically engineered, and/or nonprocessed food and whether they are more likely than their peers to meet Healthy People 2010 dietary objectives. Design: Cross-sectional analysis using data from a population-based study in Minnesota (Project EAT: Eating Among Teens). Setting: Participants completed a mailed survey and food frequency questionnaire in 2004. Participants: Males and females (N = 2516), ages 15-23 years. Main Outcome Measures: Dietary intake of fruit, vegetables, fat, grains, calcium, and fast food. Analysis: Chi-square tests, logistic regression models adjusting for race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and vegetarian status. Results: Percentages of adolescents who reported that it was somewhat or very important that their food be locally grown, organic, nongenetically engineered, and nonprocessed were 20.9%, 23.2%, 34.1%, and 29.8%, respectively. Those who valued each practice were more likely than their peers to be nonwhite (P < .001) and have a low socioeconomic status (P < .001). Adolescents who valued ≥ 2 practices were more likely than their peers to have a dietary pattern consistent with the Healthy People 2010 objectives (P < .001) for fruit, vegetable, and fat intake. Conclusions and Implications: It may beneficial to discuss alternative food production practices as part of nutrition education programs for adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-18
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

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Eating
Food
Healthy People Programs
Social Class
Vegetables
Fruit
Logistic Models
Fats
Fast Foods
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Calcium
Education
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • adolescent nutrition
  • food
  • genetically modified
  • local food
  • nutrition survey
  • organic food
  • sustainable agriculture

Cite this

Characteristics and Dietary Patterns of Adolescents Who Value Eating Locally Grown, Organic, Nongenetically Engineered, and Nonprocessed Food. / Robinson-O'Brien, Ramona; Larson, Nicole; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Hannan, Peter; Story, Mary.

In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Vol. 41, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 11-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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