Chapter 10. Relation of dietary carbohydrates to blood lipids in the special intervention and usual care groups in the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial

Jeanne L. Tillotson, Gregory A. Grandits, Glenn E. Bartsch, Jeremiah Stamler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

This chapter explores relations between reported intakes of dietary carbohydrates and measurements of plasma lipids at baseline and during trial years 1-6 of the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial. With control for dietary lipids, alcohol, and other factors, total carbohydrate intake at baseline was inversely related to baseline plasma total cholesterol and high- density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol; starch and other simple carbohydrates were unrelated to plasma lipids and sucrose was inversely related to HDL cholesterol. During trial years 1-6, men assigned to the special intervention group increased their intake of starch and other simple carbohydrates as they decreased their fat intake, and lowered their intakes of refined and processed sucrose. Total carbohydrate intake of these men was inversely related to total, low-density-lipoprotein (LDL), and HDL cholesterol. Starch and sucrose intakes were also inversely related to HDL cholesterol. In contrast, intake of other simple carbohydrates was directly related to HDL, and inversely related to plasma total and LDL cholesterol. For men in the highest quintile of intake of other simple carbohydrates compared with men in the lowest quintile, plasma total cholesterol was lower by 3.6 mg/dL. LDL cholesterol was lower by 4.3 mg/dL, and HDL cholesterol was higher by 1.6 mg/dL. Findings were generally similar for men in the usual care group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314S-326S
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume65
Issue number1 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

Keywords

  • Carbohydrate intake
  • blood lipids
  • starch
  • sucrose

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