Changing driver yielding behavior on a city-wide basis

Ron VanHouten, Nichole Morris, Curtis Craig, De Lon Dixon, Jonathan Hochmuth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study evaluated a program to increase driver yielding to pedestrians in crosswalks on a city-wide basis in two cities located within large metropolitan areas. A multifaceted treatment was used to increase yielding in both cities that consisted of highly visible enforcement, public posting of the percentage of drivers yielding to pedestrians each week along with the record on highway signs, and a low-cost engineering treatment. Enforcement and the low-cost engineering component were only introduced at half the sites termed treatment sites while these treatments were not introduced at the remaining sites that were termed generalization sites. Feedback on the number of drivers yielding to pedestrians in each city was presented at signs on busy roadways within the city and a limited amount of educational outreach to the community was implemented on a city-wide basis through parent outreach. Data were collected using staged crossings made by research assistants. Data were also collected on natural crossing made by members of the community. Data for staged crossings at the sites that received enforcement and the engineering treatment increased from a baseline level of 28% to 67% in the first city and from 29% to 74% in the second city. A more modest change occurred at the generalization sites. Data for natural crossings increased from 24% to 80% in the first city and from 48% to 78% in the second city at treatment sites. Similar changes occur for natural crossings at the generalization sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior Management
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
A grant from the Transportation Center for Livable Communities, at Western Michigan University supported the portion of this research carried out in the city of Ann Arbor, MI., and a grant from Minnesota Department of Transportation supported the portion of this research carried out in the city of Saint Paul, MN. The authors would like to thank the Ann Arbor and Saint Paul Police Departments, the City of Ann Arbor and Saint Paul Public Works Departments, the Ann Arbor and Saint Paul City Councils and Mayor’s Offices, and Ann Arbor and Saint Paul Public Schools.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Taylor & Francis.

Keywords

  • City wide behavior change
  • feedback signs
  • generalization
  • in-street signs

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