Changes in serum osteocalcin and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase are associated with bone pain in donors receiving granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor for peripheral blood stem and progenitor cell collection

M. Kent Froberg, Utam C. Garg, David F. Stroncek, Michael Geis, Jeffrey Mc Cullough, David M. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been used to increase the number of CD34+ peripheral blood stem and progenitor cells collected by apheresis for use in autologous or allogeneic progenitor cell transplantation. The most frequent side effect of G-CSF treatment is bone pain, which occurs in over 80 percent of healthy progenitor cell donors. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The possible mechanism of bone pain was investigated by measuring serum levels of osteocalcin (OC), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), acid phosphatase (ACP), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) in seven healthy progenitor cell donors treated with human recombinant G-CSF administered subcutaneously for 5 consecutive days. RESULTS: All seven patients experienced bone pain during the treatment period. Serum levels of OC, BAP, ACP, and TRAP were measured in blood samples drawn on Days 0, 4, 5, 6, and 14. Levels of BAP were increased (p<0.05) over baseline on Days 4, 5, and 6, while those of OC decreased on Days 4, 5, and 6 (p<0.05). No significant changes occurred in ACP or TRAP levels. OC and BAP are considered markers of bone formation (osteoblast activity), and they correlate in many patients with metabolic bone disorders. The pattern of increased BAP and decreased OC has been reported in patients with osteolytic bone metastases. CONCLUSION: G-CSF treatment in healthy stem and progenitor cell donors may affect osteoblastic activity, and this activity may be associated with bone pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)410-414
Number of pages5
JournalTransfusion
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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