Changes in evening-shifted loss of control eating severity following treatment for binge-eating disorder

Angeline R. Bottera, Elizabeth N. Dougherty, Glen Forester, Carol B. Peterson, Ross D. Crosby, Scott G. Engel, Scott J Crow, Jennifer E. Wildes, Stephen A. Wonderlich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Loss of control eating is more likely to occur in the evening and is uniquely associated with distress. No studies have examined the effect of treatment on within-day timing of loss of control eating severity. We examined whether time of day differentially predicted loss of control eating severity at baseline (i.e. pretreatment), end-of-treatment, and 6-month follow-up for individuals with binge-eating disorder (BED), hypothesizing that loss of control eating severity would increase throughout the day pretreatment and that this pattern would be less pronounced following treatment. We explored differential treatment effects of cognitive-behavioral guided self-help (CBTgsh) and Integrative Cognitive-Affective Therapy (ICAT). Methods Individuals with BED (N = 112) were randomized to receive CBTgsh or ICAT and completed a 1-week ecological momentary assessment protocol at baseline, end-of-treatment, and 6-month follow-up to assess loss of control eating severity. We used multilevel models to assess within-day slope trajectories of loss of control eating severity across assessment periods and treatment type. Results Within-day increases in loss of control eating severity were reduced at end-of-treatment and 6-month follow-up relative to baseline. Evening acceleration of loss of control eating severity was greater at 6-month follow-up relative to end-of-treatment. Within-day increases in loss of control severity did not differ between treatments at end-of-treatment; however, evening loss of control severity intensified for individuals who received CBTgsh relative to those who received ICAT at 6-month follow-up. Conclusions Findings suggest that treatment reduces evening-shifted loss of control eating severity, and that this effect may be more durable following ICAT relative to CBTgsh.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychological medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Cambridge University Press.

Keywords

  • binge eating
  • binge-eating disorder
  • cognitive behavioral therapy
  • integrative cognitive-affective therapy
  • loss of control
  • time of day

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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