Changes in emotion processing and social cognition with auditory versus visual neuroscience-informed cognitive training in individuals with schizophrenia

Linda Scoriels, Larissa T. Genaro, Stella Keffer, Anna Luiza Guimarães, Bárbara Barros-Dumas, Luana G. Mororó, Thales Biagioni, Camila Lucena, Thaís R. da Hora, Barbara J. Sahakian, Melissa Fisher, Sophia Vinogradov, Rogério Panizzutti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Neuroscience-informed cognitive training has been used to remediate cognitive deficits in schizophrenia, but their effect on emotion processing and social cognition deficits, which may involve auditory and visual impairments, remain relatively unknown. In this study, we compared the efficacy of auditory versus visual neuroscience-informed cognitive training on emotion processing and social cognition in individuals with schizophrenia. Methods: In this randomised, double-blind clinical trial, 79 participants with chronic schizophrenia performed 40-hours auditory or visual dynamically equivalent computerised cognitive training. We assessed emotion processing and social cognition using Emotion Recognition, Affective Go-NoGo, Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional-Intelligence, Theory of mind, and Hinting tests before and after 20 h and 40 h of training. Results: After training, participants from both groups decreased their reaction time for facial emotion recognition (p = 3 × 10−6, d = 0.9). This was more remarkable for the auditory group when analysing individual emotions. Both groups also reduced omissions in the affective go-no go (p = 0.01, d = 0.6), which was also attributed, post hoc, to the auditory group. Trends for improvement were observed in theory of mind (p = 0.06, d = 0.6) for both groups. Improvement in emotion processing was associated with improvement in reasoning and problem solving and global cognition and improvement in theory of mind was associated with improvement in attention and global cognition. Conclusions: Both the auditory and the visual neuroscience-informed cognitive training were efficacious at improving emotion processing and social cognition in individuals with schizophrenia, although improvement was more remarkable for the auditory training group. These improvements were related to cognitive – but not symptom – improvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-274
Number of pages8
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume241
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health – Fogarty International Center (Grant R03TW009002 ) to RP and SV; Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (FAPERJ) (Grant E-26/110.305/2014 ) and Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq) (Grant 400455/2012-9 ). RP is an Atlantic Fellow of the Global Brain Health Institute . BJK research is conducted within the NIHR MedTech and Invitro Diagnostic Co-operative (MIC) and the NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre (Neurodegeneration and Mental Health Themes). LS, LTG, SK, ALG, BBD, LGM, TB, CL, JO, and TRH were supported by fellowships from FAPERJ and CNPq .

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Auditory training
  • Emotion processing
  • Neuroscience-informed
  • Schizophrenia
  • Social cognition
  • Visual training

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