Changes in Bladder Health over Time: A Longitudinal Analysis of Adult Women in the Boston Area Community Health Survey

Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Research Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

PURPOSE: Our goal was to describe changes in bladder health, defined as "a complete state of physical, mental, and social well-being related to bladder function that permits daily activities, adapts to short-term stressors, and allows optimal well-being," in women over time.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used data on 15 lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and interference from urinary experiences assessed at the baseline and 5-year followup interviews of the BACH (Boston Area Community Health) Survey to estimate changes in bladder health over time in women. Associations between baseline and followup bladder health (defined as the maximum frequency of LUTS or interference at each time point) were calculated by ordinal logistic regression and generalized linear models.

RESULTS: A total of 2,526 women provided complete information on bladder health at baseline and followup. Over the 5-year followup, 6.5% of women maintained optimal bladder health (no LUTS or interference), 33.6% developed worse bladder health (including 10.4% who transitioned from optimal to less than optimal health), 31.4% maintained their less than optimal bladder health status and 28.7% improved. Despite these changes, women with poorer bladder health at baseline were still more likely to have poorer bladder health 5 years later (eg multivariable-adjusted relative risk=3.27, 95% confidence interval: 2.49-4.29 for severe LUTS/interference at followup among those with severe LUTS/interference at baseline).

CONCLUSIONS: Findings from our large secondary analysis of BACH Survey data suggest considerable variability in bladder health over time, and underscore the importance of bladder health promotion to prevent the initial onset and progression of poor bladder health in women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1086-1095
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume207
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Support: This work was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) by cooperative agreements [grants U24DK106786, U01 DK106853, U01 DK106858, U01 DK106898, U01 DK106893, U01 DK106827, U01 DK106908, U01 DK106892, U01 DK126045]. Additional funding from: National Institute on Aging, NIH Office of Research on Women's Health. The BACH Survey was conducted by the BACH Survey Investigators and supported by the NIDDK. The data from the BACH Survey reported here were supplied by the NIDDK Central Repository. This manuscript was not prepared in collaboration with Investigators of the BACH Survey and does not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of the BACH Survey, the NIDDK Central Repository, or the NIDDK. The content of this article is solely the responsibility of the authors. We thank Sarah Lindberg for assisting with data management and cleaning. We also thank the Prevention of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (PLUS) Research Consortium Investigators: Loyola University ChicagodMaywood, IL (U01DK106898) Multi-Principal Investigators: Linda Brubaker, MD; Elizabeth R. Mueller, MD, MSME Investigators: Marian Acevedo-Alvarez, MD; Colleen M. Fitzgerald, MD, MS; Cecilia T. Hardacker, MSN, RN, CNL; Jeni Hebert-Beirne, PhD, MPH; Missy Lavender, MBA; David A. Shoham, PhD, MSPH. Northwestern UniversitydChicago, IL (U01DK126045) Multi-Principal Investigators: Kimberly Sue Kenton, MD; James W. Griffith, PhD; Melissa Simon, MD, MPH Investigator: Patricia I Moreno, PhD. University of Alabama at BirminghamdBirmingham, AL (U01DK106858) Principal Investigator: Alayne D. Markland, DO, MSc Investigators: Tamera Coyne-Beasley, MD, MPH, FAAP, FSAHM; Kathryn L. Burgio, PhD; Cora E. Lewis, MD, MSPH; Gerald McGwin, Jr., MS, PhD; Camille P. Vaughan, MD, MS; Beverly Rosa Williams, PhD. University of California San DiegodLa Jolla, CA (U01DK106827) Principal Investigator: Emily S. Lukacz, MD Investigators: Sheila Gahagan, MD, MPH; D. Yvette LaCoursiere, MD, MPH; Jesse Nodora, DrPH. University of MichigandAnn Arbor, MI (U01DK106893) Principal Investigator: Janis M. Miller, PhD, APRN, FAAN Investigators: Lawrence Chin-I An, MD; Lisa Kane Low, PhD, CNM, FACNM, FAAN. University of Minnesota (Scientific and Data Coordinating Center)dMinneapolis, MN (U24DK106786) Multi-Principal Investigators: Bernard L. Harlow, PhD; Kyle D. Rudser, PhD Investigators: Sonya S. Brady, PhD; Haitao Chu, MD, PhD; Melissa L. Constantine, PhD, MPAff; Cynthia S. Fok, MD, MPH; Peter Scal, PhD; Todd Rockwood, PhD. University of PennsylvaniadPhiladelphia, PA (U01DK106892) Principal Investigator: Multi-Principal Investigators: Diane K. Newman, DNP FAAN; Ariana L. Smith, MD Investigators: Amanda Berry, MSN, CRNP; C. Neill Epperson, MD; Heather Klusaritz, PhD, MSW; Kathryn H. Schmitz, PhD, MPH, FACSM, FTOS; Ann E. Stapleton, MD; Jean F. Wyman, PhD. Washington University in St. LouisdSaint Louis, MO (U01DK106853) Principal Investigator: Siobhan Sutcliffe, PhD, ScM, MHS Investigators: Aimee S. James, PhD, MPH; Jerry L. Lowder, MD, MSc; Melanie R. Meister, MD, MSCI. Yale UniversitydNew Haven, CT (U01DK106908) Principal Investigator: Leslie M. Rickey, MD, MPH Investigators: Marie A. Brault, PhD (Dec. 2020-); Deepa R. Camenga, MD, MHS; Shayna D. Cunningham, PhD. Steering Committee Chair: Linda Brubaker, MD. UCSD, San Diego. (January 2021-) NIH Program Office: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Division of Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases, Bethesda, MD. NIH Project Scientist: Julia Barthold, MD; Past project scientist: Tamara Bavendam MD, MS (July 2015- Dec 2020)

Funding Information:
Support: This work was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) by cooperative agreements [grants U24DK106786, U01 DK106853, U01 DK106858, U01 DK106898, U01 DK106893, U01 DK106827, U01 DK106908, U01 DK106892, U01 DK126045]. Additional funding from: National Institute on Aging, NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health. The BACH Survey was conducted by the BACH Survey Investigators and supported by the NIDDK. The data from the BACH Survey reported here were supplied by the NIDDK Central Repository. This manuscript was not prepared in collaboration with Investigators of the BACH Survey and does not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of the BACH Survey, the NIDDK Central Repository, or the NIDDK. The content of this article is solely the responsibility of the authors.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 by AMERICAN UROLOGICAL ASSOCIATION EDUCATION AND RESEARCH, INC.

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Boston/epidemiology
  • Female
  • Health Surveys
  • Humans
  • Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/diagnosis
  • Prevalence
  • Public Health
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Urinary Bladder

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Changes in Bladder Health over Time: A Longitudinal Analysis of Adult Women in the Boston Area Community Health Survey'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this