Cerebral blood flow characteristics following hemodialysis initiation in older adults: A prospective longitudinal pilot study using arterial spin labeling imaging

Xiufeng Li, Yelena X. Slinin, Lin Zhang, Donald R. Dengel, David Tupper, Gregory J. Metzger, Anne M. Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate cerebral blood flow (CBF) characteristics before and after hemodialysis initiation and their longitudinal associations with global cognitive function in older adults. Methods: A cohort of 17 older end-stage renal disease patients anticipating standard thrice-weekly hemodialysis and a group of 11 age- and sex-matched healthy control volunteers were recruited for brain perfusion imaging studies using arterial spin labeling. Hemodialysis patients participated in a prospective longitudinal study using brain magnetic resonance imaging and global cognitive assessment using the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination (3MS) at two time points: baseline, 2.9 ± 0.9 months before, and follow-up, 6.4 ± 2.4 months after hemodialysis initiation. Healthy controls were imaged once using the same protocol. CBF analyses were performed globally in grey and white matter and regionally in the hippocampus and orbitofrontal cortex. Covariate-adjusted linear mixed-effects models were used for statistical analyses (significance: p < 0.05; marginal significance: p < 0.1). Results: At baseline, global and regional CBF was significantly higher in hemodialysis patients than in healthy controls. However, after approximately 6 months of hemodialysis, CBF declined substantially in hemodialysis patients, and became comparable to those in healthy controls. Specifically, in the hemodialysis patients, CBF declined non-significantly globally for grey and white matter and significantly regionally in the hippocampus and orbitofrontal cortex. Marginally significant associations were observed between 3MS scores and regional CBF measurements in the hippocampus and orbitofrontal cortex at baseline and follow-up, and between longitudinal changes. Conclusion: The significant decline in CBF after hemodialysis initiation and the observed association between longitudinal changes in regional CBF and 3MS scores suggest that decreased brain perfusion may contribute to the observed cognitive decline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102434
JournalNeuroImage: Clinical
Volume28
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by National Institute on Aging Grant R01 AG03755 , National Institute of Health P41 EB015894 and P41 EB027061 , and University of Minnesota Foundation ( UMF0003900 ). Research reported in this publication was also supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health Award UL1TR000114 . The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The authors would like to acknowledge Nan Booth (MSW, MPH, ELS, Medical Editor, Chronic Disease Research Group, Minneapolis, Minnesota) for her language editing, and proofreading.

Keywords

  • Arterial spin labeling (ASL)
  • End-stage renal disease (ESRD)
  • Hemodialysis
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  • Perfusion or cerebral blood flow (CBF)

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