Cell type-specific requirements for heparan sulfate biosynthesis at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction: Effects on synapse function, membrane trafficking, and mitochondrial localization

Yi Ren, Catherine Kirkpatrick, Joel M. Rawson, Mu Sun, Scott B. Selleck

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18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are concentrated at neuromuscular synapses in many species, including Drosophila. We have established the physiological and patterning functions of HSPGs at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction by using mutations that block heparan sulfate synthesis or sulfation to compromise HSPG function. The mutant animals showed defects in synaptic physiology and morphology suggesting that HSPGs function both presynaptically and postsynaptically; these defects could be rescued by appropriate transgene expression. Of particular interest were selective disruptions of mitochondrial localization, abnormal distributions of Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum markers in the muscle, and a markedly increased level of stimulus-dependent endocytosis in the motoneuron. Our data support the emerging view that HSPG functions are not limited to the cell surface and matrix environments, but also affect a diverse set of cellular processes including membrane trafficking and organelle distributions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8539-8550
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume29
Issue number26
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

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Neuromuscular Agents
Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans
Heparitin Sulfate
Neuromuscular Junction
Mitochondrial Membranes
Synapses
Drosophila
Motor Neurons
Endocytosis
Transgenes
Endoplasmic Reticulum
Organelles
Muscles
Mutation
Membranes

Cite this

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AU - Ren, Yi

AU - Kirkpatrick, Catherine

AU - Rawson, Joel M.

AU - Sun, Mu

AU - Selleck, Scott B.

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