CD4+ T cells that enter the draining lymph nodes after antigen injection participate in the primary response and become central-memory cells

Drew M. Catron, Lori K. Rusch, Jason Hataye, Andrea A. Itano, Marc Jenkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

120 Scopus citations

Abstract

We explored the relationship between the time of naive CD4+ T cell exposure to antigen in the primary immune response and the quality of the memory cells produced. Naive CD4+ T cells that migrated into the skin-draining lymph nodes after subcutaneous antigen injection accounted for about half of the antigen-specific population present at the peak of clonal expansion. These late-arriving T cells divided less and more retained the central-memory marker CD62L than the T cells that resided in the draining lymph nodes at the time of antigen injection. The fewer cell divisions were related to competition with resident T cells that expanded earlier in the response and a reduction in the number of dendritic cells displaying peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II complexes at later times after antigen injection. The progeny of late-arriving T cells possessed the phenotype of central-memory cells, and proliferated more extensively during the secondary response than the progeny of the resident T cells. The results suggest that late arrival into lymph nodes and exposure to antigen-presenting cells displaying lower numbers of peptide-MHC II complexes in the presence of competing T cells ensures that some antigen-specific CD4+ T cells divide less in the primary response and become central-memory cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1045-1054
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Experimental Medicine
Volume203
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 17 2006

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