Catalytic intense pulse light inactivation of Cronobacter sakazakii and other pathogens in non-fat dry milk and wheat flour

Dongjie Chen, Justin R. Wiertzema, Peng Peng, Yanling Cheng, Yunpu Wang, Juer Liu, Yiwei Ma, Wes Mosher, Myungwoo Kang, Min Min, Paul Chen, David J. Baumler, Chi Chen, Laurence Lee, Zata Vickers, Joellen Feirtag, Roger Ruan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The outbreaks of Cronobacter sakazakii, Salmonella spp, and Bacillus cereus in powdered foods have been increasing in worldwide. However, an effective method to pasteurize powdered foods before consumption remains lacking. A prototype Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) system was developed to disinfect powdered foods under different IPL and environmental conditions. Synergistic effect of IPL and TiO2 photocatalysis on microbial inactivation was studied. The results show that high energy intensity of each pulse, high peak intensity, and short pulsed duration contributed to a high microbe inactivation. With TiO2 photocatalysis, one additional log10 reduction was achieved, bringing the total log reduction to 4.71 ± 0.07 (C. sakazakii), 3.49 ± 0.01 (E. faecium), and 2.52 ± 0.10 (B. cereus) in non-fat dry milk, and 5.42 ± 0.10 (C. sakazakii), 4.95 ± 0.24 (E. faecium), 2.80 ± 0.23 (B. cereus) in wheat flour. IPL treatment combined with the TiO2 photocatalysis exhibits a strong potential to reduce the energy consumption in improving the safety of powdered foods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number127420
JournalFood Chemistry
Volume332
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work is supported by the Enhancing Food Safety through Improved Processing Technologies Program [grant no. 2016-68003-24850] from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture .

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Evaluation Study
  • Journal Article

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