Cardiovascular risk factors in ethnic minority women aged ≤30 years

Latha Palaniappan, Monique Nicole Anthony, Cynthia Mahesh, Michael Elliott, Anthony Killeen, Donald Giacherio, Melvyn Rubenfire

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Men and women of African and South Asian ancestry in the United States are increasingly recognized as being at greater risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) than Caucasians of European ancestry. Relatively little data on the genetic and lifestyle risk factors that predispose women to CHD in these ethnic minorities are available. We compared coronary risk factors in a volunteer sample of African-American, Asian Indian American, and Caucasian American women of college age. Life style, dietary, hemodynamic and anthropometric parameters, and laboratory data were sought from 70 subjects in each ethnic group. African-American women were found to have lower triglyceride levels and higher apolipoproten A-1, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), lipoprotein (a) (Lp(a)), fibrinogen, and fasting insulin levels. They also consumed more fat and cholesterol than their peers, had a higher percentage of body fat, body weight, and body mass indexes, and reported less physical activity than Caucasians. Asian Indian American women had higher Lp(a), HDL, and fibrinogen levels than Caucasian American women, and also reported less physical activity. Thus, young African- American and Asian Indian American women have several modifiable risk factors as well as some nontraditional lipid risk factors that warrant consideration for explaining the increased prevalence of CHD in these ethnic groups. The tendency toward peripheral insulin insensitivity and increased body fat in this age group of African-American women suggests diet and exercise may reduce the risk of subsequent CHD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)524-529
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume89
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cardiovascular risk factors in ethnic minority women aged ≤30 years'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this