Cardiac functional and histopathologic findings in humans and mice with mucopolysaccharidosis type I: Implications for assessment of therapeutic interventions in Hurler syndrome

Elizabeth Braunlin, Shannon Mackey-Bojack, Angela Panoskaltsis-Mortari, James M. Berry, Ron T. Mcelmurry, Megan Riddle, Li Yan Sun, Lorne A. Clarke, Jakub Tolar, Bruce R. Blazar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hurler syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type I [MPS I]) is a uniformly lethal autosomal recessive storage disease caused by absence of the enzyme α-L-iduronidase (IDUA), which is involved in lysosomal degradation of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Cardiomyopathy and valvar insufficiency occur as GAGs accumulate in the myocardium, spongiosa of cardiac valves, and myointima of coronary arteries. Here we report the functional, biochemical, and morphologic cardiac findings in the MPS I mouse. We compare the cardiac functional and histopathological findings in the mouse to human MPS I. In MPS I mice, we have noted aortic insufficiency, increased left ventricular size, and decreased ventricular function. Aortic and mitral valves are thickened and the aortic root is dilated. However, murine MPS I is not identical to human MPS I. Myointimal proliferation of epicardial coronary arteries is unique to human MPS I, whereas dilation of aortic root appears unique to murine MPS I. Despite the differences between murine and human MPS I, the murine model provides reliable in vivo outcome parameters, such as thickened and insufficient aortic valves and depressed cardiac function that can be followed to assess the impact of therapeutic interventions in preclinical studies in Hurler syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)27-32
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Research
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

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