Can't get it out of my mind: Employee rumination after customer mistreatment and negative mood in the next morning

Mo Wang, Songqi Liu, Hui Liao, Yaping Gong, John Kammeyer-Mueller, Junqi Shi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Drawing on cognitive rumination theories and conceptualizing customer service interaction as a goal attainment situation for service employees, the current study examined employee rumination about negative service encounters as an intermediate cognitive process that explains the within-person fluctuations in negative emotional reactions resulting from customer mistreatment. Multilevel analyses of 149 call-center employees' 1,189 daily surveys revealed that on days that a service employee received more (vs. less) customer mistreatment, he or she ruminated more (vs. less) at night about negative encounters with customers, which in turn led to higher (vs. lower) levels of negative mood experienced in the next morning. In addition, service rule commitment and perceived organizational support moderated the within-person effect of customer mistreatment on rumination, such that this effect was stronger among those who had higher (vs. lower) levels of service rule commitment but weaker among those who had higher (vs. lower) levels of perceived organizational support. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages989-1004
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume98
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

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Multilevel Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Call Centers

Keywords

  • Customer mistreatment
  • Customer service
  • Goal attainment
  • Mood
  • Rumination

Cite this

Can't get it out of my mind : Employee rumination after customer mistreatment and negative mood in the next morning. / Wang, Mo; Liu, Songqi; Liao, Hui; Gong, Yaping; Kammeyer-Mueller, John; Shi, Junqi.

In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 98, No. 6, 01.11.2013, p. 989-1004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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