Cancer patterns in Hmong in Minnesota, 2000 to 2012

Mosunmoluwa Oyenuga, John K. Yang, Anna E Prizment, Sally Bushhouse, Ellen W Demerath, Logan G Spector

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Minnesota has the second largest Hmong population in the United States. The objective of the current study was to estimate the cancer incidence among Hmong individuals in Minnesota between 2000 and 2012 to determine targets for screening and interventions. METHODS: Cancer cases in Minnesota between 2000 and 2012 were obtained from the Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System, and proportional incidence ratios (PIRs) were calculated. The 2000 and 2010 US Census reports were used to obtain total population estimates. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates (AAR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for Hmong individuals, Asian/Pacific Islander individuals, and all Minnesotans using direct method and Poisson regression. RESULTS: Compared with all Minnesotans, the Hmong had elevated PIRs and AARs for malignancies related to infections, including nasopharyngeal, stomach, liver, and cervical cancers. The AAR ratios in Hmong versus all Minnesotans were found to be significantly increased for nasopharyngeal (AAR, 15.90; 95% CI, 9.48-26.68), stomach (AAR, 2.99; 95% CI, 2.06-4.33), liver (AAR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.04-3.02), and cervical (AAR, 3.88; 95% CI, 2.61-5.77) cancers. The AARs in Hmong versus all Minnesotans were significantly lower for all-cause cancer (AAR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.35-0.44); cancers of the breast, lung, and colorectum; melanoma; and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Compared with Asian/Pacific Islander individuals, the rates in Hmong were significantly higher for melanoma and cervical cancer, with AAR ratios of 2.23 (95% CI, 1.09-4.56) and 1.59 (95% CI, 1.01-2.49), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with all Minnesotans, the Hmong have an increased incidence of cancers related to infectious agents. These findings indicate a need for cancer prevention and screening programs in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3560-3566
Number of pages7
JournalCancer
Volume124
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

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Confidence Intervals
Neoplasms
Incidence
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Melanoma
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms
Population Control
Censuses
Liver Neoplasms
Early Detection of Cancer
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Population
Stomach Neoplasms
Lung Neoplasms
Stomach
Breast Neoplasms
Liver
Infection

Keywords

  • Asian/Pacific Islander (API)
  • Hmong
  • Minnesota
  • age-adjusted cancer incidence rates (AARs)
  • cancer

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Cite this

Cancer patterns in Hmong in Minnesota, 2000 to 2012. / Oyenuga, Mosunmoluwa; Yang, John K.; Prizment, Anna E; Bushhouse, Sally; Demerath, Ellen W; Spector, Logan G.

In: Cancer, Vol. 124, No. 17, 01.09.2018, p. 3560-3566.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oyenuga, Mosunmoluwa ; Yang, John K. ; Prizment, Anna E ; Bushhouse, Sally ; Demerath, Ellen W ; Spector, Logan G. / Cancer patterns in Hmong in Minnesota, 2000 to 2012. In: Cancer. 2018 ; Vol. 124, No. 17. pp. 3560-3566.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Minnesota has the second largest Hmong population in the United States. The objective of the current study was to estimate the cancer incidence among Hmong individuals in Minnesota between 2000 and 2012 to determine targets for screening and interventions. METHODS: Cancer cases in Minnesota between 2000 and 2012 were obtained from the Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System, and proportional incidence ratios (PIRs) were calculated. The 2000 and 2010 US Census reports were used to obtain total population estimates. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates (AAR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (95{\%} CIs) were calculated for Hmong individuals, Asian/Pacific Islander individuals, and all Minnesotans using direct method and Poisson regression. RESULTS: Compared with all Minnesotans, the Hmong had elevated PIRs and AARs for malignancies related to infections, including nasopharyngeal, stomach, liver, and cervical cancers. The AAR ratios in Hmong versus all Minnesotans were found to be significantly increased for nasopharyngeal (AAR, 15.90; 95{\%} CI, 9.48-26.68), stomach (AAR, 2.99; 95{\%} CI, 2.06-4.33), liver (AAR, 1.77; 95{\%} CI, 1.04-3.02), and cervical (AAR, 3.88; 95{\%} CI, 2.61-5.77) cancers. The AARs in Hmong versus all Minnesotans were significantly lower for all-cause cancer (AAR, 0.39; 95{\%} CI, 0.35-0.44); cancers of the breast, lung, and colorectum; melanoma; and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Compared with Asian/Pacific Islander individuals, the rates in Hmong were significantly higher for melanoma and cervical cancer, with AAR ratios of 2.23 (95{\%} CI, 1.09-4.56) and 1.59 (95{\%} CI, 1.01-2.49), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with all Minnesotans, the Hmong have an increased incidence of cancers related to infectious agents. These findings indicate a need for cancer prevention and screening programs in this population.",
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AU - Oyenuga, Mosunmoluwa

AU - Yang, John K.

AU - Prizment, Anna E

AU - Bushhouse, Sally

AU - Demerath, Ellen W

AU - Spector, Logan G

PY - 2018/9/1

Y1 - 2018/9/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Minnesota has the second largest Hmong population in the United States. The objective of the current study was to estimate the cancer incidence among Hmong individuals in Minnesota between 2000 and 2012 to determine targets for screening and interventions. METHODS: Cancer cases in Minnesota between 2000 and 2012 were obtained from the Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System, and proportional incidence ratios (PIRs) were calculated. The 2000 and 2010 US Census reports were used to obtain total population estimates. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates (AAR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for Hmong individuals, Asian/Pacific Islander individuals, and all Minnesotans using direct method and Poisson regression. RESULTS: Compared with all Minnesotans, the Hmong had elevated PIRs and AARs for malignancies related to infections, including nasopharyngeal, stomach, liver, and cervical cancers. The AAR ratios in Hmong versus all Minnesotans were found to be significantly increased for nasopharyngeal (AAR, 15.90; 95% CI, 9.48-26.68), stomach (AAR, 2.99; 95% CI, 2.06-4.33), liver (AAR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.04-3.02), and cervical (AAR, 3.88; 95% CI, 2.61-5.77) cancers. The AARs in Hmong versus all Minnesotans were significantly lower for all-cause cancer (AAR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.35-0.44); cancers of the breast, lung, and colorectum; melanoma; and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Compared with Asian/Pacific Islander individuals, the rates in Hmong were significantly higher for melanoma and cervical cancer, with AAR ratios of 2.23 (95% CI, 1.09-4.56) and 1.59 (95% CI, 1.01-2.49), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with all Minnesotans, the Hmong have an increased incidence of cancers related to infectious agents. These findings indicate a need for cancer prevention and screening programs in this population.

AB - BACKGROUND: Minnesota has the second largest Hmong population in the United States. The objective of the current study was to estimate the cancer incidence among Hmong individuals in Minnesota between 2000 and 2012 to determine targets for screening and interventions. METHODS: Cancer cases in Minnesota between 2000 and 2012 were obtained from the Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System, and proportional incidence ratios (PIRs) were calculated. The 2000 and 2010 US Census reports were used to obtain total population estimates. Age-adjusted cancer incidence rates (AAR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for Hmong individuals, Asian/Pacific Islander individuals, and all Minnesotans using direct method and Poisson regression. RESULTS: Compared with all Minnesotans, the Hmong had elevated PIRs and AARs for malignancies related to infections, including nasopharyngeal, stomach, liver, and cervical cancers. The AAR ratios in Hmong versus all Minnesotans were found to be significantly increased for nasopharyngeal (AAR, 15.90; 95% CI, 9.48-26.68), stomach (AAR, 2.99; 95% CI, 2.06-4.33), liver (AAR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.04-3.02), and cervical (AAR, 3.88; 95% CI, 2.61-5.77) cancers. The AARs in Hmong versus all Minnesotans were significantly lower for all-cause cancer (AAR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.35-0.44); cancers of the breast, lung, and colorectum; melanoma; and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Compared with Asian/Pacific Islander individuals, the rates in Hmong were significantly higher for melanoma and cervical cancer, with AAR ratios of 2.23 (95% CI, 1.09-4.56) and 1.59 (95% CI, 1.01-2.49), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with all Minnesotans, the Hmong have an increased incidence of cancers related to infectious agents. These findings indicate a need for cancer prevention and screening programs in this population.

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