Can intensive early childhood intervention programs eliminate income- based cognitive and achievement gaps?

Greg J. Duncan, Aaron J. Sojourner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

How much of the income-based gaps in cognitive ability and academic achievement could be closed by a two-year, center-based early childhood education intervention? Data from the Infant Health and Development Program (IHDP), which randomly assigned treatment to low-birth-weight children from both higher-and low-income families between ages one and three, shows much larger impacts among low-than higher-income children. Projecting IHDP impacts to the U.S. population's IQ and achievement trajectories suggests that such a program offered to low-income children would essentially eliminate the income-based gap at age three and between a third and three-quarters of the age five and age eight gaps.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)945-968
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Human Resources
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Health
Education
Trajectories
Income
Early childhood
Infant health
Academic achievement
Low income
Low birth weight
Cognitive ability
Trajectory
Low-income families

Cite this

Can intensive early childhood intervention programs eliminate income- based cognitive and achievement gaps? / Duncan, Greg J.; Sojourner, Aaron J.

In: Journal of Human Resources, Vol. 48, No. 4, 01.01.2013, p. 945-968.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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