Calling characteristics of parasitized and unparasitized populations of the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus

Marlene Zukl, Leigh W. Simmons, Luanne Cupp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

131 Scopus citations

Abstract

Examination of three populations of the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus revealed the presence of an acoustically-orienting parasitoid fly, Ormia ochracea (Tachinidae), in the population of crickets that has been introduced to the Hawaiian Islands. The cricket is native to Australia and the Pacific, and the fly is native to North America but has also been introduced to Hawaii. Up to 27% of males and 7% of females in Hawaii were infested with fly larvae. Song structure in the parasitized Hawaiian population was distinct from that of the other two groups, with the Hawaiian crickets showing several reduced song parameters. In addition, onset and cessation of calling at dusk and dawn were more abrupt in the Hawaiian population. These results are consistent with selective pressure from the phonotactic flies to decrease risky calling. Silent males were present in all three populations, suggesting that these noncallers may not represent a unique adaptation to the parasitoid.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-343
Number of pages5
JournalBehavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1993

Keywords

  • Calling characters
  • Crickets
  • Phonotactic parasitoids

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