Calcium and Dairy Intake

Longitudinal Trends during the Transition to Young Adulthood and Correlates of Calcium Intake

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Abstract

Objective: To describe changes in calcium and dairy intake during the transition from middle adolescence to young adulthood and to identify baseline correlates of calcium intake in young adulthood. Design: Population-based, 5-year follow-up study (Project EAT: Eating Among Teens). Setting: Baseline surveys were completed in Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN schools and by mail at follow-up. Participants: Males and females (N = 1521) attending high school at baseline (mean age = 15.9 years) and with a mean age of 20.5 years at follow-up. Main Outcome Measures: Calcium intake. Analysis: Mixed and linear regression methods were used to respectively examine trends and correlates of intake. Results: During the transition to young adulthood, mean daily calcium intakes of females and males decreased by an average of 153 mg and 194 mg respectively. Mealtime milk availability, health/nutrition attitudes, taste preference for milk, healthful weight control behaviors, and peer support for healthful eating at baseline were associated with better follow-up calcium intake. Time spent watching television and lactose intolerance were associated with lower intake at follow-up. Conclusions and Implications: Nutrition interventions are needed to counter longitudinal decreases in calcium intake. Interventions targeted to adolescents should address the availability of milk at meals and other identified supports for healthful eating.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-260
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

Fingerprint

Calcium
Milk
Eating
Meals
Lactose Intolerance
Attitude to Health
Behavior Control
Television
Postal Service
Linear Models
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Weights and Measures
Population

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • calcium intake
  • dairy intake
  • longitudinal study
  • young adulthood

Cite this

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title = "Calcium and Dairy Intake: Longitudinal Trends during the Transition to Young Adulthood and Correlates of Calcium Intake",
abstract = "Objective: To describe changes in calcium and dairy intake during the transition from middle adolescence to young adulthood and to identify baseline correlates of calcium intake in young adulthood. Design: Population-based, 5-year follow-up study (Project EAT: Eating Among Teens). Setting: Baseline surveys were completed in Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN schools and by mail at follow-up. Participants: Males and females (N = 1521) attending high school at baseline (mean age = 15.9 years) and with a mean age of 20.5 years at follow-up. Main Outcome Measures: Calcium intake. Analysis: Mixed and linear regression methods were used to respectively examine trends and correlates of intake. Results: During the transition to young adulthood, mean daily calcium intakes of females and males decreased by an average of 153 mg and 194 mg respectively. Mealtime milk availability, health/nutrition attitudes, taste preference for milk, healthful weight control behaviors, and peer support for healthful eating at baseline were associated with better follow-up calcium intake. Time spent watching television and lactose intolerance were associated with lower intake at follow-up. Conclusions and Implications: Nutrition interventions are needed to counter longitudinal decreases in calcium intake. Interventions targeted to adolescents should address the availability of milk at meals and other identified supports for healthful eating.",
keywords = "adolescence, calcium intake, dairy intake, longitudinal study, young adulthood",
author = "Larson, {Nicole I.} and Dianne Neumark-Sztainer and Lisa Harnack and Melanie Wall and Mary Story and Eisenberg, {Marla E.}",
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