Building the evidence-base to reduce electronic health record-related clinician burden

Christine Dymek, Bryan Kim, Genevieve B. Melton, Thomas H. Payne, Hardeep Singh, Chun Ju Hsiao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Clinicians face competing pressures of being clinically productive while using imperfect electronic health record (EHR) systems and maximizing face-to-face time with patients. EHR use is increasingly associated with clinician burnout and underscores the need for interventions to improve clinicians' experiences. With an aim of addressing this need, we share evidence-based informatics approaches, pragmatic next steps, and future research directions to improve 3 of the highest contributors to EHR burden: (1) documentation, (2) chart review, and (3) inbox tasks. These approaches leverage speech recognition technologies, natural language processing, artificial intelligence, and redesign of EHR workflow and user interfaces. We also offer a perspective on how EHR vendors, healthcare system leaders, and policymakers all play an integral role while sharing responsibility in helping make evidence-based sociotechnical solutions available and easy to use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1057-1061
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Medical Informatics Association
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 19 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
HS is funded in part by the Houston VA Health Services Research and Development Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness and Safety (CIN13- 413), the VA Health Services Research and Development Service (CRE17-127 and the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers USA 14- 274), the VA National Center for Patient Safety, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (R01HS27363). Several studies described in this article were supported by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Grant Nos. R01 HS022085, R21 HS023602, R21 HS023631, R21 HS024541, K08 HS022901, and R01 HS27363. The findings and conclusions in this manuscript are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality or Department of Veterans Affairs.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

Keywords

  • clinician burnout
  • electronic health records
  • health information technology
  • usability
  • workflow

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