Broad autism phenotype in typically developing children predicts performance on an eye-tracking measure of joint attention

Meghan R. Swanson, Gayle C. Serlin, Michael Siller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined visual attention allocation during a set of social videos that are intended to elicit the coordination of attention with another person, compared to a control condition. Deficits in joint attention are a characteristic of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants included a diverse sample of 50 typically developing school-aged children between 3 and 9 years of age (M = 6:3, SD = 1:8). Results demonstrated that gaze allocation differed significantly between the experimental and control condition. Further, individual differences in gaze allocation were significantly predicted by a parent-report measure evaluating features of the broad autism phenotype. This study contributes to a research program that aims to develop and validate an endophenotype measure of ASD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)707-718
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Broad autism phenotype
  • Endophenotype
  • Eye-tracking
  • Gaze following
  • Response to joint attention

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