Brief Report: Does Gender Matter in Intervention for ASD? Examining the Impact of the PEERS® Social Skills Intervention on Social Behavior Among Females with ASD

Alana J. McVey, Hillary Schiltz, Angela Haendel, Bridget K. Dolan, Kirsten S. Willar, Sheryl Pleiss, Jeffrey S. Karst, Audrey M. Carson, Christina Caiozzo, Elisabeth Vogt, Amy Vaughan Van Hecke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

A paucity of research has been conducted to examine the effect of social skills intervention on females with ASD. Females with ASD may have more difficulty developing meaningful friendships than males, as the social climate can be more complex (Archer, Coyne, Personality and Social Psychology Review 9(3):212–230, 2005). This study examined whether treatment response among females differed from males. One hundred and seventy-seven adolescents and young adults with ASD (N = 177) participated in this study. When analyzed by group, no significant differences by gender emerged: PEERS® knowledge (TASSK/TYASSK, p =.494), direct interactions (QSQ, p =.762), or social responsiveness (SRS, p =.689; SSIS-RS, p =.482). Thus, females and males with ASD respond similarly to the PEERS® intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2282-2289
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume47
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This Project was funded by the Autism Society of Southeastern Wisconsin, Marquette University, and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, through Grant Nos. UL1TR001436 and KL2TR001438. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

Funding Information:
The authors would like to acknowledge grant support from the Autism Society of Southeastern Wisconsin (ASSEW), Marquette University, and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, through Grant Nos. UL1TR001436 and KL2TR001438. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH. The authors would like to thank the families for their participation in our research, as well as acknowledge the Marquette Autism Project undergraduate research team for their diligent work on this project. This paper was presented as a poster presentation at the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR) May 2016 conference under the title: Examining the Impact of the PEERS Social Skills Intervention on Females with ASD. Finally, the authors wish to extend their gratitude to Dr. Elizabeth Laugeson, Psy.D., UCLA for her assistance in offering the PEERS interventions in Wisconsin. ® ®

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017, Springer Science+Business Media New York.

Keywords

  • ASD
  • Autism
  • Females
  • Intervention
  • Social skills

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