Brief report

Associations between adolescent girls' social-emotional intelligence and violence perpetration

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined associations between social-emotional intelligence (SEI) and two measures of violence perpetration (relational aggression and physical violence) in a cross-sectional sample of high-risk adolescent girls (N=253). We evaluated three aspects of SEI: stress management, intrapersonal, and interpersonal skills. Results of a multiple linear regression model accounting for participants' age, race/ethnicity, and experiences of relational aggression victimization indicated that girls with better stress management skills were less likely to perpetrate relational aggression. A parallel model for perpetration of physical violence showed a similar pattern of results. Study findings suggest that SEI, and stress management skills in particular, may protect adolescent girls - including those who have been victims of violence - from perpetrating relational aggression and physical violence. Interventions that build adolescent girls' social and emotional skills may be an effective strategy for reducing their perpetration of violence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-71
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Adolescence
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Emotional Intelligence
Aggression
Violence
Psychological Stress
Linear Models
Crime Victims
Physical Abuse
Social Skills

Keywords

  • Female adolescents
  • Physical violence
  • Relational aggression
  • Social-emotional intelligence

Cite this

@article{46d2c4a14bc6492496bcef5f94ce8923,
title = "Brief report: Associations between adolescent girls' social-emotional intelligence and violence perpetration",
abstract = "This study examined associations between social-emotional intelligence (SEI) and two measures of violence perpetration (relational aggression and physical violence) in a cross-sectional sample of high-risk adolescent girls (N=253). We evaluated three aspects of SEI: stress management, intrapersonal, and interpersonal skills. Results of a multiple linear regression model accounting for participants' age, race/ethnicity, and experiences of relational aggression victimization indicated that girls with better stress management skills were less likely to perpetrate relational aggression. A parallel model for perpetration of physical violence showed a similar pattern of results. Study findings suggest that SEI, and stress management skills in particular, may protect adolescent girls - including those who have been victims of violence - from perpetrating relational aggression and physical violence. Interventions that build adolescent girls' social and emotional skills may be an effective strategy for reducing their perpetration of violence.",
keywords = "Female adolescents, Physical violence, Relational aggression, Social-emotional intelligence",
author = "Gower, {Amy L} and Shlafer, {Rebecca J} and Julie Polan and Annie-Laurie McRee and McMorris, {Barbara J} and Pettingell, {Sandra L.} and Sieving, {Renee E}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.adolescence.2013.10.012",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "67--71",
journal = "Journal of Adolescence",
issn = "0140-1971",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Brief report

T2 - Associations between adolescent girls' social-emotional intelligence and violence perpetration

AU - Gower, Amy L

AU - Shlafer, Rebecca J

AU - Polan, Julie

AU - McRee, Annie-Laurie

AU - McMorris, Barbara J

AU - Pettingell, Sandra L.

AU - Sieving, Renee E

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - This study examined associations between social-emotional intelligence (SEI) and two measures of violence perpetration (relational aggression and physical violence) in a cross-sectional sample of high-risk adolescent girls (N=253). We evaluated three aspects of SEI: stress management, intrapersonal, and interpersonal skills. Results of a multiple linear regression model accounting for participants' age, race/ethnicity, and experiences of relational aggression victimization indicated that girls with better stress management skills were less likely to perpetrate relational aggression. A parallel model for perpetration of physical violence showed a similar pattern of results. Study findings suggest that SEI, and stress management skills in particular, may protect adolescent girls - including those who have been victims of violence - from perpetrating relational aggression and physical violence. Interventions that build adolescent girls' social and emotional skills may be an effective strategy for reducing their perpetration of violence.

AB - This study examined associations between social-emotional intelligence (SEI) and two measures of violence perpetration (relational aggression and physical violence) in a cross-sectional sample of high-risk adolescent girls (N=253). We evaluated three aspects of SEI: stress management, intrapersonal, and interpersonal skills. Results of a multiple linear regression model accounting for participants' age, race/ethnicity, and experiences of relational aggression victimization indicated that girls with better stress management skills were less likely to perpetrate relational aggression. A parallel model for perpetration of physical violence showed a similar pattern of results. Study findings suggest that SEI, and stress management skills in particular, may protect adolescent girls - including those who have been victims of violence - from perpetrating relational aggression and physical violence. Interventions that build adolescent girls' social and emotional skills may be an effective strategy for reducing their perpetration of violence.

KW - Female adolescents

KW - Physical violence

KW - Relational aggression

KW - Social-emotional intelligence

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84888074209&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84888074209&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.adolescence.2013.10.012

DO - 10.1016/j.adolescence.2013.10.012

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 67

EP - 71

JO - Journal of Adolescence

JF - Journal of Adolescence

SN - 0140-1971

IS - 1

ER -