Brassica, biotransformation and cancer risk: Genetic polymorphisms alter the preventive effects of cruciferous vegetables

Johanna W. Lampe, Sabrina Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

156 Scopus citations

Abstract

The chemoprotective effect of cruciferous vegetables is due to their high glucosinolate content and the capacity of glucosinolate metabolites, such as isothiocyanates (ITC) and indoles, to modulate biotransformation enzyme systems (e.g., cytochromes P450 and conjugating enzymes). Data from molecular epidemiologic studies suggest that genetic and associated functional variations in biotransformation enzymes, particularly glutathione S-transferase (GST)M1 and GSTT1, which metabolize ITC, alter cancer risk in response to cruciferous vegetable exposure. Moreover, genetic polymorphisms in receptors and transcription factors that interact with these compounds may further contribute to variation in response to cruciferous vegetable intake. This review outlines the metabolism and mechanisms of action of cruciferous vegetable constituents, discusses the recent human studies testing effects of cruciferous vegetables on biotransformation systems and summarizes the epidemiologic and experimental evidence for an effect of genetic polymorphisms in these enzymes on response to cruciferous vegetable intake. Taken together, genetic differences in biotransformation enzymes and the factors that regulate them, as well as variation in glucosinolate content of cruciferous vegetables and the methods used to prepare these foods underscore the multiple layers of complexity that affect the study of gene-diet interactions and cancer risk in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2991-2994
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume132
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002

Keywords

  • Biotransformation
  • Chemoprevention
  • Cruciferae
  • Isothiocyanates
  • Polymorphism

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