Brain metastasis from cervical carcinoma

J. C. Chura, K. Shukla, P. A. Argenta

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30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to describe the features of patients with brain metastasis from cervical cancer. Twelve patients with brain metastasis from cervical cancer were identified. Information regarding symptoms, treatment, and survival was analyzed. The incidence of brain metastasis in our population was 0.77%. Median patient age at initial diagnosis of cervical cancer was 43.5 years (range 29-57 years) compared with 44.5 years (range 31-58 years) at identification of brain metastasis. Six patients had FIGO stage IB disease; three had stage IIB disease; and one each had stage IIIA, IIIB, and IVB disease. The median interval from diagnosis of cervical cancer to identification of brain metastasis was 17.5 months (range 1.1-96.1 months). All but one patient presented with neurologic symptoms. Eight patients received whole-brain irradiation and steroids, three received steroids alone, and one underwent surgery, followed by irradiation. All the patients who received whole-brain irradiation experienced improvement in their symptoms. Median survival from diagnosis of brain metastasis to death was 2.3 months (range 0.3-7.9 months). Five patients who received chemotherapy after brain irradiation had a median survival of 4.4 months compared to 0.9 months for those who received no additional treatment after brain irradiation (P =.016). Most patients with brain metastasis from cervical cancer presented with neurologic sequelae. Brain irradiation improved these symptoms. Survival after diagnosis of brain metastasis was poor; however, patients who received chemotherapy after brain irradiation appeared to have improved survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-146
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecological Cancer
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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Neoplasm Metastasis
Carcinoma
Brain
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Survival
Steroids
Drug Therapy
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System
Incidence
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Brain metastasis
  • Cervical cancer
  • Cervical carcinoma

Cite this

Brain metastasis from cervical carcinoma. / Chura, J. C.; Shukla, K.; Argenta, P. A.

In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.01.2007, p. 141-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chura, J. C. ; Shukla, K. ; Argenta, P. A. / Brain metastasis from cervical carcinoma. In: International Journal of Gynecological Cancer. 2007 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 141-146.
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