Brain effects of TMS delivered over prefrontal cortex in depressed adults: Role of stimulation frequency and coil-cortex distance

Z. Nahas, C. C. Teneback, A. Kozel, A. M. Speer, C. DeBrux, M. Molloy, L. Stallings, K. M. Spicer, G. Arana, D. E. Bohning, S. C. Risch, M. S. George

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

128 Scopus citations

Abstract

Relative regional brain blood flow was measured in 23 clinically depressed adults by using ECD SPECT at baseline and again during actual prefrontal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) following 5 daily sessions of TMS. TMS over prefrontal cortex caused increased activity in cortex directly under the stimulation (inversely correlated with distance from scalp to cortex) and decreased activity in remote regions (anterior cingulate and anterior temporal poles). High-frequency rTMS (20 Hz) caused more relative flow immediately below the TMS coil than did low-frequency rTMS (5 Hz). Confirming the hypotheses tested, repeated daily TMS over the prefrontal cortex in medication-free depressed adults appears to change both local and remote blood flow in a manner that may also depend on the frequency of stimulation and coil to outer cortex distance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-470
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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