Born Again to Work Again

Harry S Jacob

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The fascinating observation of Pearson and his coworkers, in this issue of the Journal, that traumatized spleen tissue may regrow (or be “reborn”) into splenules after its spillage into the peritoneal cavity can probably be explained by the phenomenon of work-stimulated hypertrophy. That work does provoke spleen tissue to grow is suggested by the progressive splenomegaly that regularly accompanies chronic hemolytic disorders — particularly in patients in whom the spleen is the primary site of sequestration and destruction of abnormal red cells (e.g., in hereditary spherocytosis and the thalassemias). Conversely, splenic atrophy can be induced in some animals by.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1415-1416
Number of pages2
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume298
Issue number25
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 22 1978

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Spleen
Hereditary Spherocytosis
Thalassemia
Splenomegaly
Peritoneal Cavity
Hypertrophy
Atrophy
Observation

Cite this

Born Again to Work Again. / Jacob, Harry S.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 298, No. 25, 22.06.1978, p. 1415-1416.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Jacob, Harry S. / Born Again to Work Again. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 1978 ; Vol. 298, No. 25. pp. 1415-1416.
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