Body composition measurement for the preterm neonate: using a clinical utility framework to translate research tools into clinical care

Katherine A. Bell, Sara E. Ramel, Daniel T. Robinson, Carol L. Wagner, Brian Scottoline, Mandy B. Belfort

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Body composition analysis to distinguish between fat mass and fat-free mass is an established research approach to assess nutritional status. Within neonatal medicine, preterm infant body composition is linked with later health outcomes including neurodevelopment and cardiometabolic health. Mounting evidence establishing fat-free mass as an indicator of nutritional status, coupled with the availability of testing approaches that are feasible to use in preterm infants, have enhanced interest in measuring body composition in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) setting. In this paper, we use the concept of clinical utility—the added value of a new methodology over current standard care—as a framework for assessing several existing body composition methodologies with potential for clinical application to preterm neonates. We also use this framework to identify remaining knowledge gaps and prioritize efforts to advance our understanding of clinically-oriented body composition testing in the NICU.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1550-1555
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Perinatology
Volume42
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Portions of the work presented in this manuscript were supported by grants to KAB including a Marshall Klaus Perinatal Research Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics and Early Career Award from The Gerber Foundation, and by the Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center (National Center for Advancing Translational Science, grants 1UL1TR001102 and 1UL1TR002541-01). DTR is funded by R21HD102778 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. BPS is funded by the Gerber Foundation, with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. CLW is funded in part by NIH 5R01HD043921, NIH RR01070, MUSC Department of Pediatrics, and by the South Carolina Clinical & Translational Research (SCTR) Institute, with an academic home at the Medical University of South Carolina (NIH/NCAT UL1 TR000062). MBB is funded by R01HD097327 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Center for Research Resources or the National Institutes of Health.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature America, Inc.

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Review
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Body composition measurement for the preterm neonate: using a clinical utility framework to translate research tools into clinical care'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this