Body composition at 6 months of life: Comparison of air displacement plethysmography and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry

David A. Fields, Ellen W. Demerath, Angelo Pietrobelli, Paula C. Chandler-Laney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Body composition assessment during infancy is important because it is a critical period for obesity risk development, thus valid tools are needed to accurately, precisely, and quickly determine both fat and fat-free mass. The purpose of this study was to compare body composition estimates using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and air displacement plethysmography (ADP) at 6 months old. We assessed the agreement between whole body composition using DXA and ADP in 84 full-term average-for-gestational-age boys and girls using DXA (Lunar iDXA v11-30.062; Infant whole body analysis enCore 2007 software, GE, Fairfield, CT) and ADP (Infant Body Composition System v3.1.0, COSMED USA, Concord, CA). Although the correlations between DXA and ADP for %fat (r = 0.925), absolute fat mass (r = 0.969), and absolute fat-free mass (r = 0.945) were all significant, body composition estimates by DXA were greater for both %fat (31.1 ± 3.6% vs. 26.7 ± 4.7%; P < 0.001) and absolute fat mass (2,284 ± 449 vs. 1,921 ± 492 g; P < 0.001), and lower for fat-free mass (5,022 ± 532 vs. 5,188 ± 508 g; P < 0.001) vs. ADP. Inter-method differences in %fat decreased with increasing adiposity and differences in fat-free mass decreased with increasing infant age. Estimates of body composition determined by DXA and ADP at 6 months of age were highly correlated, but did differ significantly. Additional work is required to identify the technical basis for these rather large inter-method differences in infant body composition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2302-2306
Number of pages5
JournalObesity
Volume20
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

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Plethysmography
Photon Absorptiometry
Body Composition
Fats
Air
X-Rays
Adiposity
Gestational Age
Software
Obesity

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Body composition at 6 months of life : Comparison of air displacement plethysmography and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. / Fields, David A.; Demerath, Ellen W.; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Chandler-Laney, Paula C.

In: Obesity, Vol. 20, No. 11, 01.11.2012, p. 2302-2306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fields, David A. ; Demerath, Ellen W. ; Pietrobelli, Angelo ; Chandler-Laney, Paula C. / Body composition at 6 months of life : Comparison of air displacement plethysmography and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. In: Obesity. 2012 ; Vol. 20, No. 11. pp. 2302-2306.
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abstract = "Body composition assessment during infancy is important because it is a critical period for obesity risk development, thus valid tools are needed to accurately, precisely, and quickly determine both fat and fat-free mass. The purpose of this study was to compare body composition estimates using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and air displacement plethysmography (ADP) at 6 months old. We assessed the agreement between whole body composition using DXA and ADP in 84 full-term average-for-gestational-age boys and girls using DXA (Lunar iDXA v11-30.062; Infant whole body analysis enCore 2007 software, GE, Fairfield, CT) and ADP (Infant Body Composition System v3.1.0, COSMED USA, Concord, CA). Although the correlations between DXA and ADP for {\%}fat (r = 0.925), absolute fat mass (r = 0.969), and absolute fat-free mass (r = 0.945) were all significant, body composition estimates by DXA were greater for both {\%}fat (31.1 ± 3.6{\%} vs. 26.7 ± 4.7{\%}; P < 0.001) and absolute fat mass (2,284 ± 449 vs. 1,921 ± 492 g; P < 0.001), and lower for fat-free mass (5,022 ± 532 vs. 5,188 ± 508 g; P < 0.001) vs. ADP. Inter-method differences in {\%}fat decreased with increasing adiposity and differences in fat-free mass decreased with increasing infant age. Estimates of body composition determined by DXA and ADP at 6 months of age were highly correlated, but did differ significantly. Additional work is required to identify the technical basis for these rather large inter-method differences in infant body composition.",
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