Abstract

Background: There are limited data comparing the relative associations of various BMI metrics with adiposity and cardiometabolic risk factors in youth. Objective: Examine correlations of 7 different BMI metrics with adiposity, cardiometabolic risk factors, and biomarkers (i.e. blood pressure, waist circumference, cholesterol, leptin, insulin, high molecular weight adiponectin, high-sensitivity c-reactive protein (hsCRP)). Methods: This was a cross-sectional analysis of youth in all BMI categories. BMI metrics: BMI z-score (BMIz), extended BMIz (ext.BMIz), BMI percentile (BMIp), percent of the BMI 95th percentile (%BMIp95), percent of the BMI median (%BMIp50), triponderal mass index (TMI), and BMI (BMI). Correlations between these BMI metrics and adiposity, visceral adiposity, cardiometabolic risk factors and biomarkers were summarized using Pearson’s correlations. Results: Data from 371 children and adolescents ages 8–21 years old were included in our analysis: 52% were female; 20.2% with Class I obesity, 20.5% with Class II, and 14.3% with Class III obesity. BMIp consistently demonstrated lower correlations with adiposity, risk factors, and biomarkers (r = 0.190–0.768) than other BMI metrics. The %BMIp95 and %BMIp50 were marginally more strongly correlated with measures of adiposity as compared to other BMI metrics. The ext.BMIz did not meaningfully outperform BMIz. Conclusion: Out of all the BMI metrics evaluated, %BMIp95 and %BMIp50 were the most strongly correlated with measures of adiposity. %BMIp95 has the benefit of being used currently to define obesity and severe obesity in both clinical and research settings. BMIp consistently had the lowest correlations. Future research should evaluate the longitudinal stability of various BMI metrics and their relative associations with medium to long-term changes in adiposity and cardiometabolic outcomes in the context of intervention trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by R01-HL110957 (ASK), and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health Award Number UL1TR000114. CTB was funded by the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, grants KL2TR002492 and UL1TR002494. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Limited.

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'BMI metrics and their association with adiposity, cardiometabolic risk factors, and biomarkers in children and adolescents'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this