Blue Skies Bluer?

Julian D. Marshall, Joshua S. Apte, Jay S Coggins, Andrew L. Goodkind

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The largest U.S. environmental health risk is cardiopulmonary mortality from ambient PM2.5. The concentration-response (C-R) for ambient PM2.5 in the U.S. is generally assumed to be linear: from any initial baseline, a given concentration reduction would yield the same improvement in health risk. Recent evidence points to the perplexing possibility that the PM2.5 C-R for cardiopulmonary mortality and some other major endpoints might be supralinear: a given concentration reduction would yield greater improvements in health risk as the initial baseline becomes cleaner. We explore the implications of supralinearity for air policy, emphasizing U.S. conditions. If C-R is supralinear, an economically efficient PM2.5 target may be substantially more stringent than under current standards. Also, if a goal of air policy is to achieve the greatest health improvement per unit of PM2.5 reduction, the optimal policy might call for greater emission reductions in already-clean locales-making "blue skies bluer"-which may be at odds with environmental equity goals. Regardless of whether the C-R is linear or supralinear, the health benefits of attaining U.S. PM2.5 levels well below the current standard would be large. For the supralinear C-R considered here, attaining the current U.S. EPA standard, 12 μg m-3, would avert only -17% (if C-R is linear: - 25%) of the total annual cardiopulmonary mortality attributable to PM2.5.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13929-13936
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume49
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2015

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health risk
Health risks
mortality
Health
air
environmental risk
equity
Air
well
policy
health
environmental health
emission reduction

Cite this

Marshall, J. D., Apte, J. S., Coggins, J. S., & Goodkind, A. L. (2015). Blue Skies Bluer? Environmental Science and Technology, 49(24), 13929-13936. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.5b03154

Blue Skies Bluer? / Marshall, Julian D.; Apte, Joshua S.; Coggins, Jay S; Goodkind, Andrew L.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 49, No. 24, 15.12.2015, p. 13929-13936.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marshall, JD, Apte, JS, Coggins, JS & Goodkind, AL 2015, 'Blue Skies Bluer?', Environmental Science and Technology, vol. 49, no. 24, pp. 13929-13936. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.5b03154
Marshall JD, Apte JS, Coggins JS, Goodkind AL. Blue Skies Bluer? Environmental Science and Technology. 2015 Dec 15;49(24):13929-13936. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.5b03154
Marshall, Julian D. ; Apte, Joshua S. ; Coggins, Jay S ; Goodkind, Andrew L. / Blue Skies Bluer?. In: Environmental Science and Technology. 2015 ; Vol. 49, No. 24. pp. 13929-13936.
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