Birth characteristics, maternal reproductive history, and the risk of infant leukemia: A report from the children's oncology group

Logan G. Spector, Stella M. Davies, Leslie L. Robison, Joanne M. Hilden, Michelle Roesler, Julie A. Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Leukemias with MLL gene rearrangements predominate in infants (<1 year of age), but not in older children, and may have a distinct etiology. High birth weight, higher birth order, and prior fetal loss have, with varying consistency, been associated with infant leukemia, but no studies have reported results with respect to MLL status. Here, we report for the first time such an analysis. During 1999 to 2003, mothers of 240 incident cases (113 MLL +, 80 MLL-, and 47 indeterminate) and 255 random digit dialed controls completed a telephone interview. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for quartile of birth weight, birth order, gestational age, maternal age at delivery, prior fetal loss, pre-pregnancy body mass index, and weight gain during pregnancy were obtained using unconditional logistic regression; P for linear trend was obtained by modeling continuous variables. There was a borderline significant linear trend of increasing birth weight with MLL + (P = 0.06), but not MLL- (P = 0.93), infant leukemia. Increasing birth order showed a significant inverse linear trend, independent of birth weight, with MLL+ (P = 0.01), but not MLL- (P = 0.18), infant leukemia. Other variables of interest were not notably associated with infant leukemia regardless of MLL status. This investigation further supports the contention that molecularly defined subtypes of infant leukemia have separate etiologies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-134
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007

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