Biomarkers for Success: Using Neuroimaging to Predict Relapse and Develop Brain Stimulation Treatments for Cocaine-Dependent Individuals

C. A. Hanlon, L. T. Dowdle, J. L. Jones

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cocaine dependence is one of the most difficult substance use disorders to treat. While the powerful effects of cocaine use on behavior were documented in the 19th century, it was not until the late 20th century that we realized cocaine use was affecting brain tissue and function. Following a brief introduction (Section 1), this chapter will summarize our current knowledge regarding alterations in neural circuit function typically observed in chronic cocaine users (Section 2) and highlight an emerging body of literature which suggests that pretreatment limbic circuit activity may be a reliable predictor of clinical outcomes among individuals seeking treatment for cocaine (Section 3). Finally, as the field of addiction research strives to translate this neuroimaging data into something clinically meaningful, we will highlight several new brain stimulation approaches which utilize functional brain imaging data to design noninvasive brain stimulation interventions for individuals seeking treatment for substance dependence disorders (Section 4).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationImaging the Addicted Brain, 2016
EditorsNatalie M. Zahr, Eric T. Peterson
PublisherAcademic Press Inc.
Pages125-156
Number of pages32
ISBN (Print)9780128039144
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameInternational Review of Neurobiology
Volume129
ISSN (Print)0074-7742
ISSN (Electronic)2162-5514

Keywords

  • Brain stimulation
  • Cocaine
  • Connectivity
  • Executive
  • Functional MRI
  • Limbic
  • Prefrontal
  • Striatum
  • TMS
  • Treatment

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