Biological osteosynthesis versus traditional anatomic reconstruction of 20 long-bone fractures using an interlocking nail: 1994-2001

Christopher L. Horstman, Brian S. Beale, Michael G. Conzemius, Rich Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective - To observe differences in surgical and healing times as well as complication rates in dogs with a comminuted long-bone fracture stabilized with an interlocking nail (IN) using either anatomic or biologic repair. Study Design - Retrospective study. Animals - Twenty client-owned dogs with comminuted long-bone fractures. Methods - Medical records for dogs with fractures repaired during a 7-year period were reviewed; 20 dogs had repair with an IN nail and radiographic evidence of healing. These 20 dogs where divided into 2 groups, anatomic (11 dogs) and biological (9) repair, for statistical evaluation. Surgical and healing time and complication rates were compared between groups. Results - Median surgical times were: anatomic (95 minutes) and biologic (110 minutes; P = .06). Median healing times were anatomic (8 weeks) and biologic (6 weeks; P = .04). No statistical differences were observed in complication rates (the likelihood that a case required a second surgery [P = .58], the likelihood of a complication that was managed non-surgically [P = .27]). Use of a bone graft did not shorten healing times (P = .55). Conclusions - Biological osteosynthesis provides clinical advantages over anatomic reconstruction with respect to a reduction in surgical and healing time without increasing complication rates. Clinical Relevance - Highly comminuted long-bone fractures can be successfully repaired using an IN without reconstructing the fracture fragments in dogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)232-237
Number of pages6
JournalVeterinary Surgery
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2004

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