Best Practices for Nutrition Care of Pregnant Women in Prison

Rebecca J Shlafer, Jamie S Stang, Danielle Dallaire, Catherine A. Forestell, Wendy L Hellerstedt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Approximately 3% to 4% of women are pregnant upon their admission to prison. Pregnant inmates present unique challenges for correctional health providers, including meeting the nutritional needs for healthy pregnancy outcomes. The authors outline six recommendations for nutrition care for pregnant inmates, including (1) test for pregnancy; (2) prescribe prenatal vitamins; (3) follow nutrition recommendations outlined by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics; (4) provide additional food, monitor over time, and allow for modifications to meet pregnancy needs; (5) ensure regular access to water; and (6) provide inmates with resources and education on healthy diet. The degree to which correctional facilities address the nutritional needs of pregnant women may have short- and long-term consequences for the health of women and their offspring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-304
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Correctional Health Care
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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Prisons
Practice Guidelines
Pregnant Women
Pregnancy Tests
Dietetics
Women's Health
Pregnancy Outcome
Vitamins
Education
Food
Pregnancy
Water
Health
Healthy Diet

Keywords

  • correctional health care
  • female inmates
  • nutrition
  • pregnancy
  • women’s health

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Best Practices for Nutrition Care of Pregnant Women in Prison. / Shlafer, Rebecca J; Stang, Jamie S; Dallaire, Danielle; Forestell, Catherine A.; Hellerstedt, Wendy L.

In: Journal of Correctional Health Care, Vol. 23, No. 3, 01.07.2017, p. 297-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shlafer, Rebecca J ; Stang, Jamie S ; Dallaire, Danielle ; Forestell, Catherine A. ; Hellerstedt, Wendy L. / Best Practices for Nutrition Care of Pregnant Women in Prison. In: Journal of Correctional Health Care. 2017 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 297-304.
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