Behavioral, social, and affective factors associated with self-efficacy for self-management among people with epilepsy

Colleen DiIorio, Patricia Osborne Shafer, Richard Letz, Thomas R. Henry, Donald L. Schomer, Katherine Yeager

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of the study described in this article was to evaluate the extent to which selected behavioral, social, and affective factors contribute to self-reported epilepsy self-efficacy. Participants completed three assessments 3 months apart, with only those completing both the first and second assessments included in this analysis. Self-efficacy scores at the second assessment were regressed on the behavioral, social, and affective characteristics ascertained at the first assessment. The analysis revealed that self-management, depressive symptoms, and seizure severity explain the most variance in self-efficacy; patient satisfaction and stigma are less important predictors; and social support and regimen-specific support are not significant predictors. The results provide direction for identifying people with low levels of self-efficacy and highlighting areas that might help enhance self-efficacy in persons with epilepsy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)158-163
Number of pages6
JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006

Keywords

  • Adults
  • Depression
  • Epilepsy
  • Self-efficacy
  • Stigma

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