Behavioral predictors of individual differences in opioid addiction vulnerability as measured using i.v. self-administration in rats

Yayi Swain, Jonathan C. Gewirtz, Andrew C. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Like other forms of psychopathology, vulnerability to opioid addiction is subject to wide individual differences. Animal behavioral models are valuable in advancing our understanding of mechanisms underlying vulnerability to the disorder's development and amenability to treatment. Methods: This review provides an overview of preclinical work on behavioral predictors of opioid addiction vulnerability as measured using the intravenous (i.v.) self-administration (SA) model in rats. We also highlight several new approaches to studying individual differences in opioid addiction vulnerability in preclinical models that could have greater sensitivity and lead to more clinically relevant findings. Results and conclusions: Evidence for the relationship between various behavioral traits and opioid SA in the preclinical literature is limited. With the possible exceptions of sensitivity to opioid agonist/withdrawal effects and stress reactivity, predictors of individual differences in SA of other drugs of abuse (e.g. sensation-seeking, impulsivity) do not predict vulnerability to opioid SA in rats. Refinement of SA measures and the use of multivariate designs and statistics could help identify predictors of opioid SA and lead to more clinically relevant studies on opioid addiction vulnerability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number108561
JournalDrug and alcohol dependence
Volume221
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding for this study was provided by NIH/NIDA grant R21 DA037728 (Gewirtz JC and Harris, AC, co-PIs), NIH/NIDA grant U01 DA051993 (Gewirtz JC and Harris, AC, co-PIs), NIH / NIDA training grant T32 DA007097 (Swain, Y; Molitor T, PI), and the Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute (formerly Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation) Career Development Award (Harris, AC) . These funding institutions had no role in the study design, data collection, data analysis, interpretation of the data, manuscript preparation, or decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Elsevier B.V.

Keywords

  • Addiction vulnerability
  • Behavioral economics
  • Individual differences
  • Multivariate statistics
  • Opioid addiction
  • Opioid self-administration

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Review
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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