Basic concepts and methods for joint models of longitudinal and survival data

Joseph G. Ibrahim, Haitao Chu, Liddy M. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

120 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Joint models for longitudinal and survival data are particularly relevant to many cancer clinical trials and observational studies in which longitudinal biomarkers (eg, circulating tumor cells, immune response to a vaccine, and quality-of-life measurements) may be highly associated with time to event, such as relapse-free survival or overall survival. In this article, we give an introductory overview on joint modeling and present a general discussion of a broad range of issues that arise in the design and analysis of clinical trials using joint models. To demonstrate our points throughout, we present an analysis from the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group trial E1193, as well as examine some operating characteristics of joint models through simulation studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2796-2801
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume28
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

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Joints
Clinical Trials
Circulating Neoplastic Cells
Observational Studies
Vaccines
Biomarkers
Quality of Life
Recurrence
Neoplasms

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Basic concepts and methods for joint models of longitudinal and survival data. / Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Chu, Haitao; Chen, Liddy M.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 28, No. 16, 01.06.2010, p. 2796-2801.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Ibrahim, Joseph G. ; Chu, Haitao ; Chen, Liddy M. / Basic concepts and methods for joint models of longitudinal and survival data. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2010 ; Vol. 28, No. 16. pp. 2796-2801.
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