Basic airway skills acquisition using the American College of Surgeons/Association for Surgical Education medical student simulation-based surgical skills curriculum: Initial results

Sydne Muratore, Michael Kim, Jaisa Olasky, Andre Campbell, Robert Acton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background The ACS/ASE Medical Student Simulation-Based Skills Curriculum was developed to standardize medical student training. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and validity of implementing the basic airway curriculum. Methods This single-center, prospective study of medical students participating in the basic airway module from 12/2014–3/2016 consisted of didactics, small-group practice, and testing in a simulated clinical scenario. Proficiency was determined by a checklist of skills (1–15), global score (1–5), and letter grade (NR-needs review, PS-proficient in simulation scenario, CP-proficient in clinical scenario). A proportion of students completed pre/post-test surveys regarding experience, satisfaction, comfort, and self-perceived proficiency. Results Over 16 months, 240 students were enrolled with 98% deemed proficient in a simulated or clinical scenario. Pre/post-test surveys (n = 126) indicated improvement in self-perceived proficiency by 99% of learners. All students felt moderately to very comfortable performing basic airway skills and 94% had moderate to considerable satisfaction after completing the module. Conclusions The ACS/ASE Surgical Skills Curriculum is a feasible and effective way to teach medical students basic airway skills using simulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-237
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican journal of surgery
Volume213
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Keywords

  • Basic airway
  • Medical student
  • Simulation
  • Standardized curriculum
  • Surgical education
  • Surgical skills

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