Barriers to Quitting Smoking Among Young Adults: The Role of Socioeconomic Status

Samantha Carlson, Rachel L Widome, Lindsey Fabian, Xianghua Luo, Jean Forster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The aims of this analysis were to explore how self-reported barriers to quitting vary by socioeconomic status (SES) among young-adult smokers and to assess their relationship to quitting. Design: This analysis uses 2 waves of telephone-survey data from the Minnesota Adolescent Community Cohort study. Setting: Midwestern United States. Participants: Participants (n = 419) were smokers aged 17 to 24 years. Measures: Socioeconomic status was estimated using the highest level of education completed by the participants’ parents. Demographics, smoking behavior, and perceived barriers to quitting were collected via survey questions. Analysis: Differences in barriers by SES were assessed using prevalence ratios (PRs). Relative risks were calculated to assess the association between barriers and quitting status 1 year later, testing for effect modification by SES. Results: Compared to the high SES group (n = 314), the low SES group (n = 105) was more likely to report several barriers to quitting; however, only the risk of gaining weight was significantly more common (PR: 1.38 [1.05-1.83]). There were no significant associations between barriers and quitting status 1 year later, but the number of cigarettes per day was consistently related to the likelihood of quitting 1 year later, regardless of SES. Conclusion: Despite the limited generalizability to racially diverse populations and different geographic locations, the results suggest perceived barriers may not differ by SES or predict quitting among young adults; however, nicotine dependence may play an important role.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)294-300
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Social Class
young adult
smoking
Young Adult
social status
Smoking
status group
Midwestern United States
Geographic Locations
Tobacco Use Disorder
level of education
Telephone
Tobacco Products
nicotine
telephone
parents
Cohort Studies
Parents
Demography
adolescent

Keywords

  • barriers
  • cessation
  • smoking
  • socioeconomic status
  • young adults

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Cite this

Barriers to Quitting Smoking Among Young Adults : The Role of Socioeconomic Status. / Carlson, Samantha; Widome, Rachel L; Fabian, Lindsey; Luo, Xianghua; Forster, Jean.

In: American Journal of Health Promotion, Vol. 32, No. 2, 01.02.2018, p. 294-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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