Automated head motion system improves reliability and lessens operator dependence for head impulse testing of vestibular reflexes

Grace X. Tan, Desi P. Schoo, Charles C.Della Santina, Mehdi A. Rahman, Nicolas S. Valentin Contreras, Chen Hsin Sun, Bryce Chiang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Deficiency of the eye-stabilizing vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is a defining feature in multiple diseases of the vestibular labyrinth, which comprises the inner ear's sensors of head rotation, translation and orientation. Diagnosis of these disorders is facilitated by observation and measurement of eye movements during and after head motion. The video head impulse test has recently garnered interest as a clinical diagnostic assessment of vestibular dysfunction. In typical practice, it involves use of video-oculography goggles to measure eye movements while a clinician examiner grasps the subject's head and manually rotates it left or right at sufficient acceleration to cover ∼20 deg over ∼150 mS, reaching a peak velocity of >120 deg/S midway through the movement. Manual delivery of head impulses incurs significant trial-by-trial, inter-session and interoperator variability, which lessens the test's reliability, efficiency, safety and standardization across testing facilities. We describe application of a novel, compact and portable automated head impulse test (aHIT™) device that delivers highly repeatable head motion stimuli about axes parallel to those of the vestibular labyrinth's six semicircular canals, with programmable Gaussian and sinusoidal motion profiles at amplitudes, velocities and accelerations sufficient to test VOR function over the spectral range for which the VOR dominates other vision-stabilizing reflexes. We tested the aHIT™ on human subjects and demonstrated its high reproducibility compared to manually delivered head impulses. This device has the potential to be a valuable clinical and research tool for diagnostic evaluation and investigation of the vestibular system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages94-99
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781509029839
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 19 2017
Event12th IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Rochester, United States
Duration: May 7 2017May 10 2017

Publication series

Name2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings

Conference

Conference12th IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017
CountryUnited States
CityRochester
Period5/7/175/10/17

Fingerprint

Impulse testing
reflexes
Eye movements
Reflex
impulses
Head Impulse Test
Head
Goggles
Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex
operators
Canals
Labyrinth Vestibule
labyrinth
eye movements
Standardization
Eye Movement Measurements
semicircular canals
Sensors
Testing
Eye Protective Devices

Keywords

  • aHIT
  • automated head impulse test
  • head impulse test
  • vestibular system
  • vestibulo-ocular reflex

Cite this

Tan, G. X., Schoo, D. P., Santina, C. C. D., Rahman, M. A., Valentin Contreras, N. S., Sun, C. H., & Chiang, B. (2017). Automated head motion system improves reliability and lessens operator dependence for head impulse testing of vestibular reflexes. In 2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings (pp. 94-99). [7985856] (2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/MeMeA.2017.7985856

Automated head motion system improves reliability and lessens operator dependence for head impulse testing of vestibular reflexes. / Tan, Grace X.; Schoo, Desi P.; Santina, Charles C.Della; Rahman, Mehdi A.; Valentin Contreras, Nicolas S.; Sun, Chen Hsin; Chiang, Bryce.

2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017. p. 94-99 7985856 (2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Tan, GX, Schoo, DP, Santina, CCD, Rahman, MA, Valentin Contreras, NS, Sun, CH & Chiang, B 2017, Automated head motion system improves reliability and lessens operator dependence for head impulse testing of vestibular reflexes. in 2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings., 7985856, 2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 94-99, 12th IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017, Rochester, United States, 5/7/17. https://doi.org/10.1109/MeMeA.2017.7985856
Tan GX, Schoo DP, Santina CCD, Rahman MA, Valentin Contreras NS, Sun CH et al. Automated head motion system improves reliability and lessens operator dependence for head impulse testing of vestibular reflexes. In 2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2017. p. 94-99. 7985856. (2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1109/MeMeA.2017.7985856
Tan, Grace X. ; Schoo, Desi P. ; Santina, Charles C.Della ; Rahman, Mehdi A. ; Valentin Contreras, Nicolas S. ; Sun, Chen Hsin ; Chiang, Bryce. / Automated head motion system improves reliability and lessens operator dependence for head impulse testing of vestibular reflexes. 2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017. pp. 94-99 (2017 IEEE International Symposium on Medical Measurements and Applications, MeMeA 2017 - Proceedings).
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