Autobiographical memory functioning among abused, neglected, and nonmaltreated children: the overgeneral memory effect.

Kristin Valentino, Sheree L. Toth, Dante Cicchetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This investigation addresses whether there are differences in the form and content of autobiographical memory recall as a function of maltreatment, and examines the roles of self-system functioning and psychopathology in autobiographical memory processes. METHODS: Autobiographical memory for positive and negative nontraumatic events was evaluated among abused, neglected, and nonmaltreated school-aged children. RESULTS: Abused children's memories were more overgeneral and contained more negative self-representations than did those of the nonmaltreated children. Negative self-representations and depression were significantly related to overgeneral memory, but did not mediate the relation between abuse and overgeneral memory. CONCLUSIONS: The meaning of these findings for models of memory and for the development of overgenerality is emphasized. Moreover, the clinical implications of the current research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1029-1038
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines
Volume50
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2009

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Autobiographical memory functioning among abused, neglected, and nonmaltreated children: the overgeneral memory effect.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this