Author Meets Readers: Robert Nichols in Conversation with Kelly Aguirre, Phil Henderson, Cressida J. Heyes, Alana Lentin, and Corey Snelgrove

Kelly Aguirre, Phil Henderson, Cressida J. Heyes, Alana Lentin, Robert Nichols, Corey Snelgrove

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Kelly Aguirre, Phil Henderson, Cressida J. Heyes, Alana Lentin, and Corey Snelgrove engage with different aspects of Robert Nichols’ Theft is Property! Dispossession and Critical Theory. Henderson focuses on possible spaces for maneuver, agency, contradiction, or failure in subject formation available to individuals and communities interpellated through diremptive processes. Heyes homes in on the ritual of antiwill called “consent” that systematically conceals the operation of power. Aguirre foregrounds tensions in projects of critical theory scholarship that aim for dialogue and solidarity with Indigenous decolonial struggles. Lentin draws attention to the role of race in undergirding the logic of Anglo-settler colonial domination that operates through dispossession, while Snelgrove emphasizes the link between alienation, capital, and colonialism. In his reply to his interlocutors, Nichols clarifies aspects of his “recursive logics” of dispossession, a dispossession or theft through which the right to property is generated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-221
Number of pages41
JournalJournal of World Philosophies
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 21 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2021 Kelly Aguirre, Phil Henderson, Cressida J. Heyes, Alana Lentin, Robert Nichols, and Corey Snelgrove.

Keywords

  • consent
  • diremption
  • dispossession
  • Indigenous lands
  • race
  • recursive logics of dispossession
  • theft
  • treaty

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Author Meets Readers: Robert Nichols in Conversation with Kelly Aguirre, Phil Henderson, Cressida J. Heyes, Alana Lentin, and Corey Snelgrove'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this