ATXN1-CIC Complex Is the Primary Driver of Cerebellar Pathology in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 through a Gain-of-Function Mechanism

Maxime W.C. Rousseaux, Tyler Tschumperlin, Hsiang Chih Lu, Elizabeth P. Lackey, Vitaliy V. Bondar, Ying Wooi Wan, Qiumin Tan, Carolyn J. Adamski, Jillian Friedrich, Kirk Twaroski, Weili Chen, Jakub Tolar, Christine Henzler, Ajay Sharma, Aleksandar Bajić, Tao Lin, Lisa Duvick, Zhandong Liu, Roy V. Sillitoe, Huda Y. Zoghbi & 1 others Harry T. Orr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases are caused by expansion of translated CAG repeats in distinct genes leading to altered protein function. In spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), a gain of function of polyQ-expanded ataxin-1 (ATXN1) contributes to cerebellar pathology. The extent to which cerebellar toxicity depends on its cognate partner capicua (CIC), versus other interactors, remains unclear. It is also not established whether loss of the ATXN1-CIC complex in the cerebellum contributes to disease pathogenesis. In this study, we exclusively disrupt the ATXN1-CIC interaction in vivo and show that it is at the crux of cerebellar toxicity in SCA1. Importantly, loss of CIC in the cerebellum does not cause ataxia or Purkinje cell degeneration. Expression profiling of these gain- and loss-of-function models, coupled with data from iPSC-derived neurons from SCA1 patients, supports a mechanism in which gain of function of the ATXN1-CIC complex is the major driver of toxicity. Rousseaux, Tschumperlin, Lu, and colleagues show that formation of the ATXN1-CIC complex is critical for polyQ-expanded ATXN1-mediated toxicity. They find that this complex mediates its effects through a gain-of-function mechanism in the cerebellum of SCA1 mice and SCA1 patient-derived neurons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1235-1243.e5
JournalNeuron
Volume97
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 21 2018

Fingerprint

Spinocerebellar Ataxias
Pathology
Cerebellum
Neurons
Purkinje Cells
Ataxia
Ataxin-1
polyglutamine
Genes
Proteins

Keywords

  • ATXN1
  • CIC
  • RAN translation
  • RNA toxicity
  • ataxia
  • cerebellum
  • neurodegeneration
  • polyglutamine
  • toxicity

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Cite this

ATXN1-CIC Complex Is the Primary Driver of Cerebellar Pathology in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 through a Gain-of-Function Mechanism. / Rousseaux, Maxime W.C.; Tschumperlin, Tyler; Lu, Hsiang Chih; Lackey, Elizabeth P.; Bondar, Vitaliy V.; Wan, Ying Wooi; Tan, Qiumin; Adamski, Carolyn J.; Friedrich, Jillian; Twaroski, Kirk; Chen, Weili; Tolar, Jakub; Henzler, Christine; Sharma, Ajay; Bajić, Aleksandar; Lin, Tao; Duvick, Lisa; Liu, Zhandong; Sillitoe, Roy V.; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Orr, Harry T.

In: Neuron, Vol. 97, No. 6, 21.03.2018, p. 1235-1243.e5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rousseaux, MWC, Tschumperlin, T, Lu, HC, Lackey, EP, Bondar, VV, Wan, YW, Tan, Q, Adamski, CJ, Friedrich, J, Twaroski, K, Chen, W, Tolar, J, Henzler, C, Sharma, A, Bajić, A, Lin, T, Duvick, L, Liu, Z, Sillitoe, RV, Zoghbi, HY & Orr, HT 2018, 'ATXN1-CIC Complex Is the Primary Driver of Cerebellar Pathology in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 through a Gain-of-Function Mechanism', Neuron, vol. 97, no. 6, pp. 1235-1243.e5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2018.02.013
Rousseaux, Maxime W.C. ; Tschumperlin, Tyler ; Lu, Hsiang Chih ; Lackey, Elizabeth P. ; Bondar, Vitaliy V. ; Wan, Ying Wooi ; Tan, Qiumin ; Adamski, Carolyn J. ; Friedrich, Jillian ; Twaroski, Kirk ; Chen, Weili ; Tolar, Jakub ; Henzler, Christine ; Sharma, Ajay ; Bajić, Aleksandar ; Lin, Tao ; Duvick, Lisa ; Liu, Zhandong ; Sillitoe, Roy V. ; Zoghbi, Huda Y. ; Orr, Harry T. / ATXN1-CIC Complex Is the Primary Driver of Cerebellar Pathology in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 through a Gain-of-Function Mechanism. In: Neuron. 2018 ; Vol. 97, No. 6. pp. 1235-1243.e5.
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AU - Lu, Hsiang Chih

AU - Lackey, Elizabeth P.

AU - Bondar, Vitaliy V.

AU - Wan, Ying Wooi

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AU - Friedrich, Jillian

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AU - Chen, Weili

AU - Tolar, Jakub

AU - Henzler, Christine

AU - Sharma, Ajay

AU - Bajić, Aleksandar

AU - Lin, Tao

AU - Duvick, Lisa

AU - Liu, Zhandong

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AU - Zoghbi, Huda Y.

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